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Life Sciences - Feb 24
Life Sciences
Researchers reconstruct migration movements through ancient DNA A Team around Anthropologist Ron Pinhasi from the University of Vienna - together with researchers from the University of Florence and Harvard University - found out that prehistoric migration from Africa, Asia and Europe to the Mediterranean islands took place long before the era of the Mediterranean seafaring civilizations.
Life Sciences - Feb 14
Life Sciences

A new analysis suggests that an asymmetry pattern shared with great apes was adapted for lateralized, uniquely human cognitive abilities The left and right side of the brain are involved in different tasks.

Physics - Feb 4
Physics

Actually they had been looking for something completely different, but they found a previously unknown quasi-particle: A bound state of two electrons, two holes and light.

Health - Feb 5
Health

Researchers discover a novel checkpoint in immune cells with the potential to treat the cancer cell microenvironment The recognition of bacterial infections or foreign substances is mediated and controlled by the human immune system.

Chemistry - Feb 4
Chemistry

Physicists show unique polymer behavior using computer simulations Employing a computer simulation, physicists Maximilian Liebetreu and Christos Likos have shown a unique dynamic behavior of cyclic polymers.


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Life Sciences - 24.02.2020
Each Mediterranean island has its own genetic pattern
Each Mediterranean island has its own genetic pattern
Researchers reconstruct migration movements through ancient DNA A Team around Anthropologist Ron Pinhasi from the University of Vienna - together with researchers from the University of Florence and Harvard University - found out that prehistoric migration from Africa, Asia and Europe to the Mediterranean islands took place long before the era of the Mediterranean seafaring civilizations.

Life Sciences - 14.02.2020
Human brain asymmetry is not unique, but its variability is
Human brain asymmetry is not unique, but its variability is
A new analysis suggests that an asymmetry pattern shared with great apes was adapted for lateralized, uniquely human cognitive abilities The left and right side of the brain are involved in different tasks. This functional lateralization and associated brain asymmetry are well documented in humans, but little is known about brain asymmetry in our closest living relatives, the great apes.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.02.2020
Targeting the cancer microenvironment
Targeting the cancer microenvironment
Researchers discover a novel checkpoint in immune cells with the potential to treat the cancer cell microenvironment The recognition of bacterial infections or foreign substances is mediated and controlled by the human immune system. This innate and adaptive immune system comprises the most important metabolic and cellulare processes to fight against infections and other diseases.

Physics - Materials Science - 04.02.2020
New quasi-particle discovered: the Pi-ton
New quasi-particle discovered: the Pi-ton
Actually they had been looking for something completely different, but they found a previously unknown quasi-particle: A bound state of two electrons, two holes and light. In physics, there are very different types of particles: Elementary particles are the fundamental building blocks of matter. Other particles, such as atoms, are bound states consisting of several smaller constituents.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 04.02.2020
Dancing Matter: New form of movement of cyclic macromolecules discovered
Dancing Matter: New form of movement of cyclic macromolecules discovered
Physicists show unique polymer behavior using computer simulations Employing a computer simulation, physicists Maximilian Liebetreu and Christos Likos have shown a unique dynamic behavior of cyclic polymers. Their motion can be distinguished into phases, and the scientists were able to observe the so-called "inflation phase" for the first time.

Physics - 03.02.2020
How Nature Tells us its Formulas
How Nature Tells us its Formulas
Developing a quantum description for a many-body system is extremely hard. TU Wien (Vienna) and Heidelberg University found a way to obtain quantum theories directly from the experiment. Many of the biggest questions in physics can be answered with the help of quantum field theories: They are needed to describe the dynamics of many interacting particles, and thus they are just as important in solid state physics as in cosmology.

Physics - 30.01.2020
A Quantum of Solid
A Quantum of Solid
Researchers in Austria use lasers to levitate and cool a glass nanoparticle into the quantum regime. Although it is trapped in a room temperature environment, the particle's motion is solely governed by the laws of quantum physics. The team of scientists from the University of Vienna, the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) published their new study .

Materials Science - 29.01.2020
The paint testing machine
The paint testing machine
How can you prevent cracks from forming after painting? TU Wien has recently patented two new measuring processes that show which paint is best. It's a familiar problem for anyone who has renovated a house or flat: no building is a perfectly rigid body. Walls and ceilings can move slightly over time, which often leads to cracks in the paint on the walls.

Physics - Chemistry - 24.01.2020
How to Take a Picture of a Light Pulse
How to Take a Picture of a Light Pulse
Until now, complex experimental equipment was required to measure the shape of a light pulse. A team from TU Wien (Vienna), MPI Garching and LMU Munich has now made this much easier. Today, modern lasers can generate extremely short light pulses, which can be used for a wide range of applications from investigating materials to medical diagnostics.

Physics - Materials Science - 20.01.2020
Record-breaking Terahertz Laser Beam
Record-breaking Terahertz Laser Beam
A new, extremely efficient source of terahertz radiation has been developed at TU Wien (Vienna): Lasers turn air into plasma, thereby producing terahertz rays for many possible applications. Terahertz radiation is used for security checks at airports, for medical examinations and also for quality checks in industry.

Physics - Materials Science - 17.01.2020
A New Look at
A New Look at "Strange Metals"
For years, a new synthesis method has been developed at TU Wien (Vienna) to unlock the secrets of "strange metals". Now a breakthrough has been achieved. The results have been published in "Science". Superconductors allow electrical current to flow without any resistance - but only below a certain critical temperature.

Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 13.01.2020
Quantum encryption realized under the sea
Quantum encryption realized under the sea
An international team of researchers from the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the University of Vienna established a quantum encrypted connection between Sicily and Malta via a submarine cable. The record distance of 192 kilometres was a further step in the development of a secure quantum internet.

Chemistry - Physics - 08.01.2020
A new form of glass through molecular entanglement
A new form of glass through molecular entanglement
Physicists at the University of Vienna in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have discovered a new type of glass formed by long, cyclic molecules. The scientists successfully demonstrated that by making parts of the rings more mobile, the rings become more strongly entangled and the molecular fluid glassifies.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science / Telecom - 07.01.2020
The giant in our stars
The giant in our stars
Interconnected stellar nurseries form the largest gaseous structure ever observed in the Milky Way galaxy. Astronomers of the University of Vienna and Harvard University have discovered a monolithic, wave-shaped gaseous structure - the largest ever seen in our galaxy - made up of interconnected stellar nurseries.

Physics - 18.11.2019
A Remote Control for Everything Small
A Remote Control for Everything Small
Atoms, molecules or even living cells can be manipulated with light beams. At TU Wien a method was developed to revolutionize such "optical tweezers". They are reminiscent of the "tractor beam" in Star Trek: special light beams can be used to manipulate molecules or small biological particles. Even viruses or cells can be captured or moved.

Physics - Materials Science - 14.11.2019
New Material Breaks World Record Turning Heat into Electricity
New Material Breaks World Record Turning Heat into Electricity
A new type of material generates electrical current very efficiently from temperature differences. This allows sensors and small processors to supply themselves with energy wirelessly. Thermoelectric materials can convert heat into electrical energy. This is due to the so-called Seebeck effect: If there is a temperature difference between the two ends of such a material, electrical voltage can be generated and current can start to flow.

Environment - 12.11.2019
Applying biodiversity conservation research in practice
Applying biodiversity conservation research in practice
One million species are threatened with extinction, many of them already in the coming decades. This unprecedented loss of biodiversity threatens valuable ecosystems and human well-being. But what is holding us back from putting conservation research into practice? The journal Biological Conservation has published a collection of 14 articles on this topic.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 07.11.2019
Ancient Rome: a 12,000-year history of genetic flux, migrations and diversity
Ancient Rome: a 12,000-year history of genetic flux, migrations and diversity
Scholars have been all over Rome for hundreds of years, but it still holds some secrets - for instance, relatively little is known about where the city's denizens actually came from. Now, an international team led by Researchers from the University of Vienna, Stanford University and Sapienza University of Rome, is filling in the gaps with a genetic history that shows just how much the Eternal City's populace mirrored its sometimes tumultuous history.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 04.11.2019
From cone snail venom to pain relief
From cone snail venom to pain relief
Conotoxins are bioactive peptides found in the venom that marine cone snails produce for prey capture and defense. They are used as pharmacological tools to study pain signalling and have the potential to become a new class of analgesics. To date, more than 10,000 conotoxin sequences have been discovered.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.10.2019
Atomic images reveal unusually many neighbors for some oxygen atoms
Atomic images reveal unusually many neighbors for some oxygen atoms
The identification of new chemical bonds is crucial for the design of new material structures. A team led by Jani Kotakoski at the University of Vienna and Jannik Meyer at the University of Tübingen has found unexpected new configurations of oxygen and nitrogen in graphene. Direct images of the actual atoms and the analysis of Life as we know it is based on just a handful of different types of atoms (called elements), among them carbon, nitrogen and oxygen.

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