news 2016

Chemistry - Sep 11
Chemistry
Scientists use deep neural networks to achieve simulations on long time scales The prediction of molecular reactions triggered by light is to date extremely time-consuming and therefore costly. A team led by Philipp Marquetand from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna has now presented a method using artificial neural networks that drastically accelerates the simulation of light-induced processes.
Astronomy - Sep 4
Astronomy

Researchers from European countries discuss life in the Universe at the University of Vienna Astrobiology is a young, rapidly developing branch of science that seeks to address the question of whether life exists, or has existed, elsewhere in the Universe.

Chemistry - Aug 27
Chemistry

The research group of Nuno Maulide from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna has, in cooperation with the Research Center for Molecular Medicine (CeMM) of the Austrian Academy of Sc

Physics - Sep 2
Physics

The interplay of quantum mechanics and special relativity requires a new alphabet to send reliable quantum messages Quantum information relies on the possibility of writing messages in a quantum particle and reading them out in a reliable way.

Physics - Aug 22
Physics

The theories of quantum mechanics and gravity are notorious for being incompatible, despite the efforts of scores of physicists over the past fifty years.


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Health - Chemistry - 21.12.2016
One more piece in the puzzle of liver cancer identified
One more piece in the puzzle of liver cancer identified
Manuela Baccarini and her team at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL) of the University of Vienna and Medical University of Vienna are one step closer to unravelling the mechanisms behind liver cancer. The researchers discovered that RAF1, a protein known as an oncogene in other systems, unexpectedly acts as a tumour suppressor in hepatocellular carcinoma.

Physics - Electroengineering - 21.12.2016
Graphene able to transport huge currents on the nano scale
Graphene able to transport huge currents on the nano scale
New experiments have shown that it is possible for extremely high currents to pass through graphene, a form of carbon. This allows imbalances in electric charge to be rapidly rectified. The strong electric field of the highly charged ions is able to tear dozens of electrons away from the graphene within a matter of femtoseconds.

Philosophy - 07.12.2016
More order with less judgment: An optimal theory of the evolution of cooperation
More order with less judgment: An optimal theory of the evolution of cooperation
Optional moral assessment can promote cooperation more effectively than compulsory moral assessment A research team led by Mathematician Tatsuya Sasaki from the University of Vienna presents a new optimal theory of the evolution of reputation-based cooperation. This team proves that the practice of making moral assessments conditionally is very effective in establishing cooperation in terms of evolutionary game theory.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 04.12.2016
When protein crystals grow
When protein crystals grow
Chemists are investigating a substance class for biological and pharmaceutical applications Annette Rompel and her team of the Department of Biophysical Chemistry at the University of Vienna are investigating so-called polyoxometalates. These compounds exhibit a great diversity and offer the scientists a wide range of applications.

Art and Design - Social Sciences - 30.11.2016
We like what experts like - and what is expensive
We like what experts like - and what is expensive
Whether Peter Paul Rubens or Damien Hirst - the personal taste of art can be argued. Scientists from the Faculty of Psychology of the University of Vienna have now shown that the individual taste of art is also dependent on social factors. The personal valuation of art was influenced by who else liked the work - or not.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.11.2016
A molecular switch between Life, Sex and Death
A molecular switch between Life, Sex and Death
"Till death do us part" - for marine bristle worms, these words are invariably true: Shortly after mating, the parent worms die, leaving thousands of newly fertilized eggs to develop in the water. This extreme all-or-nothing mode of reproduction demonstrates a general principle: Animals need to decide if they invest their available energy stores either in growth or in reproduction.

Physics - 22.11.2016
New Quantum States for Better Quantum Memories
New Quantum States for Better Quantum Memories
How can quantum information be stored as long as possible? An important step forward in the development of quantum memories has been achieved by a research team of TU Wien. An artificial diamond under the optical microscope. The diamond fluoresces because due to a number of nitrogen defects. Measurement equipment for the production of durable quantum states.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 21.11.2016
Right timing is crucial in life
Right timing is crucial in life
Humans, as well as many other organisms, possess internal clocks. The exact timing, however, can differ between individuals - for instance, some people are early risers whereas others are "night owls". Neurobiologist Kristin Tessmar-Raible and her team at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL) of the University of Vienna and Medical University of Vienna investigated that underlie such timing variations or "chronotypes".

Physics - 16.11.2016
New records set up with
New records set up with "Screws of Light"
The research team around Anton Zeilinger has succeeded in breaking two novel records while experimenting with so-called twisted particles of light. In one experiment, the scientists could show that the twist of light itself, i.e. the screw-like structure, is maintained over a free-space propagation of 143 kilometers, which could revolutionize future data transmission.

Physics - Administration - 15.11.2016
Controlling Electrons in Time and Space
Controlling Electrons in Time and Space
Sharp metal needles can be used to emit electrons. A quantum effect opens up new possibilities of controlling electron emission with extremely high accuracy. In an electron microscope, electrons are emitted by pointy metal tips, that way the can be steered and controlled with high precision. Recently, such metal tips have also been used as high precision electron sources for generating x-rays.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.11.2016
Which genes are crucial for the energy metabolism of Archaea?
Which genes are crucial for the energy metabolism of Archaea?
Microorganisms like bacteria and archaea play an indispensable ecological role in the global geochemical cycles. A research team led by ERC prizewinner Christa Schleper from the Department of Ecogenomics and Systems Biology at the University of Vienna succeeded in isolating the first ammonia-oxidizing archaeon from soil: "Nitrososphaera viennensis" - the "spherical ammonia oxidizer from Vienna".

Physics - Chemistry - 11.11.2016
Two Paths at Once: Watching the Buildup of Quantum Superpositions
Two Paths at Once: Watching the Buildup of Quantum Superpositions
Scientists observe how quantum superpositions build up in a helium atom within femtoseconds. Just like in the famous double-slit experiment, there are two ways to reach the final outcome. It is definitely the most famous experiment in quantum physics: in the double slit experiment, a particle is fired onto a plate with two parallel slits, so there are two different paths on which the particle can reach the detector on the other side.

Physics - 07.11.2016
Watching Quantum Jumps
Watching Quantum Jumps
Scientists from TU Wien (Vienna, Austria) and Germany present the most accurate time measurements of quantum jumps to date. Quantum particles can change their state very quickly - this is called a ‘quantum jump'. An atom, for example, can absorb a photon, thereby changing into a state of higher energy.

Astronomy / Space Science - Continuing Education - 07.11.2016
The birth of massive stars is accompanied by strong luminosity bursts
The birth of massive stars is accompanied by strong luminosity bursts
Astronomers of the Universities of Tübingen and Vienna are investigating the basic principles of the formation of stars "How do massive stars form?" is one of the fundamental questions in modern astrophysics, because these massive stars govern the energy budget of their host galaxies.

Physics - Chemistry - 03.11.2016
Nanostructures Made of Pure Gold
Nanostructures Made of Pure Gold
It is the Philosopher's Stone of Nanotechnology: using a technological trick, scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) have succeeded in creating nanostructures made of pure gold.

Life Sciences - 24.10.2016
"Farming" bacteria to boost growth in the oceans
Marine symbiotic bacteria may help to "fertilize" animal growth in the oceans. Microbiologist Jillian Petersen and colleagues from the University of Vienna and the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology have discovered that chemosynthetic bacteria in marine animals can fix nitrogen as well as carbon.

Chemistry - 24.10.2016
3D-Printed Magnets
3D-Printed Magnets
How can you produce a magnet with exactly the right magnetic field? TU Wien has a solution: for the first time, magnets can be made with a 3D printer. Today, manufacturing strong magnets is no problem from a technical perspective. It is, however, difficult to produce a permanent magnet with a magnetic field of a specific pre-determined shape.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.10.2016
Taking out the cellular
Taking out the cellular "trash" - at the right place and the right time
New insight about how cells dispose of their waste is now given by the group of Claudine Kraft at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL) of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna. They show the necessity of a regulation in space and time of a key protein involved in cellular waste disposal.

Life Sciences - 19.10.2016
Azure-winged magpies show human-like generosity
Azure-winged magpies show human-like generosity
uni:view magazin Videos Presse Social Media Azure-winged magpies, an Asian bird species, take any opportunity to provide food to their group members, even without receiving any reward themselves. A team of cognitive biologists, lead by Lisa Horn and Jorg Massen from the University of Vienna, showed this type of prosocial behavior experimentally in a bird species for the first time.

Physics - Chemistry - 11.10.2016
"Weighing" atoms with electrons
uni:view magazin Videos Presse Social Media The chemical properties of atoms depend on the number of protons in their nuclei, placing them into the periodic table. However, even chemically identical atoms can have different masses - these variants are called isotopes. Although techniques to measure such mass differences exist, these have either not revealed where they are in a sample, or have required dedicated instrumentation and laborious sample preparation.
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