news 2016

« BACK

Chemistry



Results 1 - 17 of 17.


Health - Chemistry - 21.12.2016
One more piece in the puzzle of liver cancer identified
One more piece in the puzzle of liver cancer identified
Manuela Baccarini and her team at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL) of the University of Vienna and Medical University of Vienna are one step closer to unravelling the mechanisms behind liver cancer. The researchers discovered that RAF1, a protein known as an oncogene in other systems, unexpectedly acts as a tumour suppressor in hepatocellular carcinoma.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 04.12.2016
When protein crystals grow
When protein crystals grow
Chemists are investigating a substance class for biological and pharmaceutical applications Annette Rompel and her team of the Department of Biophysical Chemistry at the University of Vienna are investigating so-called polyoxometalates. These compounds exhibit a great diversity and offer the scientists a wide range of applications.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 21.11.2016
Right timing is crucial in life
Right timing is crucial in life
Humans, as well as many other organisms, possess internal clocks. The exact timing, however, can differ between individuals - for instance, some people are early risers whereas others are "night owls". Neurobiologist Kristin Tessmar-Raible and her team at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL) of the University of Vienna and Medical University of Vienna investigated that underlie such timing variations or "chronotypes".

Physics - Chemistry - 11.11.2016
Two Paths at Once: Watching the Buildup of Quantum Superpositions
Two Paths at Once: Watching the Buildup of Quantum Superpositions
Scientists observe how quantum superpositions build up in a helium atom within femtoseconds. Just like in the famous double-slit experiment, there are two ways to reach the final outcome. It is definitely the most famous experiment in quantum physics: in the double slit experiment, a particle is fired onto a plate with two parallel slits, so there are two different paths on which the particle can reach the detector on the other side.

Physics - Chemistry - 03.11.2016
Nanostructures Made of Pure Gold
Nanostructures Made of Pure Gold
It is the Philosopher's Stone of Nanotechnology: using a technological trick, scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) have succeeded in creating nanostructures made of pure gold.

Chemistry - 24.10.2016
3D-Printed Magnets
3D-Printed Magnets
How can you produce a magnet with exactly the right magnetic field? TU Wien has a solution: for the first time, magnets can be made with a 3D printer. Today, manufacturing strong magnets is no problem from a technical perspective. It is, however, difficult to produce a permanent magnet with a magnetic field of a specific pre-determined shape.

Physics - Chemistry - 11.10.2016
"Weighing" atoms with electrons
uni:view magazin Videos Presse Social Media The chemical properties of atoms depend on the number of protons in their nuclei, placing them into the periodic table. However, even chemically identical atoms can have different masses - these variants are called isotopes. Although techniques to measure such mass differences exist, these have either not revealed where they are in a sample, or have required dedicated instrumentation and laborious sample preparation.

Physics - Chemistry - 22.08.2016
Artificial Atom? Created in Graphene
Artificial Atom? Created in Graphene
Electrons reveal their quantum properties when they are confined to small spaces. Scientists from TU Wien (Vienna), Aachen and Manchester have created tiny quantum dots in Graphene.

Physics - Chemistry - 22.08.2016
,,Artificial Atom
,,Artificial Atom" Created in Graphene
Electrons reveal their quantum properties when they are confined to small spaces. Scientists from TU Wien (Vienna), Aachen and Manchester have created tiny quantum dots in Graphene. The charged tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and an additional magnetic field lead to localized stable electron states in graphene.

Chemistry - Physics - 27.07.2016
Lonely Atoms, Happily Reunited
Lonely Atoms, Happily Reunited
The remarkable behaviour of platinum atoms on magnetite surfaces could lead to better catalysts. Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) can now explain how platinum atoms can form pairs with the help of carbon monoxide. At first glance, magnetite appears to be a rather inconspicuous grey mineral. But on an atomic scale, it has remarkable properties: on magnetite, single metal atoms are held in place, or they can be made to move across the surface.

Physics - Chemistry - 18.07.2016
A glimpse inside the atom
A glimpse inside the atom
Using electron microscopes, it is possible to image individual atoms. Scientists at TU Wien have calculated how it is possible to look inside the atom to image individual electron orbitals. An electron microscope can't just snap a photo like a mobile phone camera can. The ability of an electron microscope to image a structure - and how successful this imaging will be - depends on how well you understand the structure.

Physics - Chemistry - 05.07.2016
How water gets its exceptional properties
How water gets its exceptional properties
Water is liquid at room temperature - astounding for such a small molecule. Insights into the causes are provided by a new simulation method, which has its origins in brain research. Using artificial neural networks, researchers in Bochum and Vienna have examined the atomic interactions of water molecules.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 20.06.2016
How a cold gets into cells
How a cold gets into cells
Viruses smuggle their genetic material into our cells. How this actually works is currently being investigated at TU Wien (Vienna) using a new combination of analysis methods. Cold viruses cause us irritation by penetrating into our cells and transporting their RNA into the cytoplasma of the infected cells.

Physics - Chemistry - 04.04.2016
Unraveling truly one dimensional carbon solids
Unraveling truly one dimensional carbon solids
Elemental carbon appears in many different forms, including diamond and graphite. Their unique structural, electrical and optical properties have a broad range of potential applications in composite materials and nanoelectronics. Within the "carbon family", only carbyne, the truly one-dimensional form of carbon, has not yet been synthesized; although studied for the last 50 years, its extreme instability in ambient conditions has rendered the final experimental proof of its existence elusive.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 21.03.2016
Yellow as the sunrise
Yellow as the sunrise
What is it that walnut leaves, mushrooms and Coreopsis have in common? An enzyme that is also responsible for the browning reaction in bananas or apples is present in all of them in large amounts. For the first time, chemists from the University of Vienna around Annette Rompel have analysed the structure of the enzyme in the leaves of Coreopsis.

Chemistry - Mechanical Engineering - 08.03.2016
TU Wien develops injection moulding process for aluminium alloys
TU Wien develops injection moulding process for aluminium alloys
From powder to solid metal pieces - with a bit of technical trickery, processes that are already used successfully for other materials can now also be used for aluminium.

Physics - Chemistry - 19.01.2016
High-performance material polyimide for the first time with angular shape
High-performance material polyimide for the first time with angular shape
Using a new synthesis procedure developed at TU Wien, it is now possible to produce the extremely resistant material polyimide in the form of angular particles for the first time. Polyimides withstand extreme heat and chemically aggressive solvents, while being considerably less dense than metals. That is why they are very popular in industry, for example as an insulation layer on PCBs or in aerospace applications.