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Life Sciences - Oct 21
Life Sciences
Bacteria rapidly modify mobile parts of their genome to develop resistance to viruses. Bacterial viruses, so-called phages, destroy bacteria. Bacteria are constantly exposed to viral attacks. A research team led by Martin Polz, a microbiologist at the University of Vienna, has now studied how bacteria defend themselves against viral predators.
Chemistry - Oct 14
Chemistry

Photoinitiators ensure that liquid plastic - for example for dental fillings - hardens quickly by means of light. Thanks to a new synthesis method developed by TU Graz, these initiators can be produced cheaply, something which will open up further doors for the technology.

Materials Science - Sep 28
Materials Science

The new Christian Doppler Laboratory for Measurement Systems for Harsh Operating Conditions at TU Graz is conducting research into suitable measurement techniques that can deliver precise results in tough operating and environmental conditions.

Chemistry - Sep 29
Chemistry

Chemists demonstrate new approach to self-assembly of colloidal nanoparticles.

Environment - Sep 16
Environment

Study shows that microplastics do not contribute to the mobility of organic pollutants in agricultural soils.


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Results 1 - 20 of 35.


Life Sciences - Health - 21.10.2021
Fighting viruses with interchangeable defense genes
Fighting viruses with interchangeable defense genes
Bacteria rapidly modify mobile parts of their genome to develop resistance to viruses Bacterial viruses, so-called phages, destroy bacteria. Bacteria are constantly exposed to viral attacks. A research team led by Martin Polz, a microbiologist at the University of Vienna, has now studied how bacteria defend themselves against viral predators.

Chemistry - Health - 14.10.2021
Let there be Light: Photoinitiators for Dental Fillings, Contact Lenses and Dentures etc
Let there be Light: Photoinitiators for Dental Fillings, Contact Lenses and Dentures etc
Photoinitiators ensure that liquid plastic - for example for dental fillings - hardens quickly by means of light. Thanks to a new synthesis method developed by TU Graz, these initiators can be produced cheaply, something which will open up further doors for the technology. Anyone who has ever been in the dentist's chair with a hole in their tooth is probably familiar with the procedure.

Chemistry - Physics - 29.09.2021
Molecular burdocks: peptides guide self-assembly on the micrometre scale
Molecular burdocks: peptides guide self-assembly on the micrometre scale
Chemists demonstrate new approach to self-assembly of colloidal nanoparticles Sometimes even small forces can make comparatively big things happen: In a study in "Angewandte Chemie", scientists from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna showed how short peptides can trigger the self-assembly of comparatively large nanoparticles into new structures on the micrometre scale.

Materials Science - 28.09.2021
Getting the measure of tricky measurements
Getting the measure of tricky measurements
The new Christian Doppler Laboratory for Measurement Systems for Harsh Operating Conditions at TU Graz is conducting research into suitable measurement techniques that can deliver precise results in tough operating and environmental conditions. Although measurement technology has come a long way, established approaches often come up against their limits in difficult operating and environmental conditions, ultimately delivering inaccurate results or even none at all.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.09.2021
Good for groundwater - bad for crops? Plastic particles release pollutants in upper soil layers
Good for groundwater - bad for crops? Plastic particles release pollutants in upper soil layers
Study shows that microplastics do not contribute to the mobility of organic pollutants in agricultural soils In agriculture, large quantities of nanoand microplastics end up in the soil through compost, sewage sludge and the use of mulching foils. The plastic particles always carry various pollutants with them.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.09.2021
Gut bacteria influence brain development
Gut bacteria influence brain development
Researchers discover biomarkers that indicate early brain injury in extreme premature infants Extremely premature infants are at a high risk for brain damage. Researchers at the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna have now found possible targets for the early treatment of such damage outside the brain: Bacteria in the gut of premature infants may play a key role.

Physics - Computer Science - 02.09.2021
Way to check that quantum computers return accurate answers
Way to check that quantum computers return accurate answers
Quantum computers become ever more powerful, but how can we be sure that the answers they return are accurate? A team of physicists from Vienna, Innsbruck, Oxford, and Singapore solves this problem by letting quantum computers check each other. Quantum computers are advancing at a rapid pace and are already starting to push the limits of the world's largest supercomputers.

Astronomy / Space Science - 17.08.2021
How special are we?
How special are we?
Nearby star-forming region yields clues to the formation of our solar system A region of active star formation in the constellation Ophiuchus gives astronomers new insights into the conditions in which our solar system was born, showing how it may have become enriched with short-lived radioactive elements.

Physics - Materials Science - 12.08.2021
Modeling uncovers an 'atomic waltz' for atom manipulation
Modeling uncovers an ’atomic waltz’ for atom manipulation
Researchers at the University of Vienna's Faculty of Physics in collaboration with colleagues from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the USA have uncovered a non-destructive mechanism to manipulate donor impurities within silicon using focused electron irradiation. In this novel indirect exchange process not one but two neighbouring silicon atoms are involved in a coordinated atomic "waltz", which may open a path for the fabrication of solid-state qubits.

Physics - 06.08.2021
Emergent magnetic monopoles controlled at room temperature
Emergent magnetic monopoles controlled at room temperature
Three dimensional (3D) nano-network promise a new era in modern solid state physics with numerous applications in photonics, bio-medicine, and spintronics. The realization of 3D magnetic nano-architectures could enable ultra-fast and low-energy data storage devices. Due to competing magnetic interactions in these systems magnetic charges or magnetic monopoles can emerge, which can be utilized as mobile, binary information carriers.

Chemistry - Mathematics - 28.07.2021
From chemical Graphs To Structures
From chemical Graphs To Structures
Three-dimensional (3D) configurations of atoms dictate all materials properties. Quantitative predictions of accurate equilibrium structures, 3D coordinates of all atoms, from a chemical graph, a representation of the structural formula, is a challenging and computationally expensive task which is at the beginning of practically every computational chemistry workflow.

Health - 27.07.2021
Attachment style secures your love during lockdowns
Attachment style secures your love during lockdowns
What constitutes good relationship quality in times of crisis Relationships are crucial for our health and well-being. But which factors help to sustain a satisfying relationship, and can we predict which relationships make it through a crisis? An international team led by Stephanie Eder of the University of Vienna set out to investigate these questions during a time when 'hard lockdowns' were introduced throughout Europe.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.07.2021
Root exudation and biological nitrification potential in pearl millet can boost sustainable agriculture
Root exudation and biological nitrification potential in pearl millet can boost sustainable agriculture
Agriculture is the main source for the majority of the input of reactive N to terrestrial systems; large amounts of fertilizer N are lost from the root zone as nitrate through leaching and denitrification. Avoiding the combination of high external inputs with low resource use efficiency remains a major concern for the sustainability of N in agroecosystems.

Physics - 14.07.2021
Heisenberg Under the Microscope
Heisenberg Under the Microscope
The quantum movements of a small glass sphere could be controlled for the first time in Vienna by combining microscopy with control engineering, setting the course for future quantum technologies. A football is not a quantum particle. There are crucial differences between the things we know from everyday life and tiny quantum objects.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.07.2021
Symbionts sans frontieres: Bacterial partners travel the world
Symbionts sans frontieres: Bacterial partners travel the world
This pandemic year has seen us confined to our homes and restricted from travelling the world. Not so for some microscopic bacteria in the ocean: Throughout the globe, they partner up with clams from the family Lucinidae, which live unseen in the sand beneath the shimmering blue waters of coastal habitats.

Physics - Chemistry - 13.07.2021
Electrons in quantum liquid gain energy from laser pulses
Electrons in quantum liquid gain energy from laser pulses
The absorption of energy from laser light by free electrons in a liquid has been demonstrated for the first time. Until now, this process was observed only in the gas phase. The findings, led by Graz University of Technology, open new doors for ultra-fast electron microscopy. The investigation and development of materials crucially depends on the ability to observe smallest objects at fastest time scales.

Life Sciences - Environment - 12.07.2021
Human environmental genome recovered in the absence of skeletal remains
Human environmental genome recovered in the absence of skeletal remains
Ancient sediments from caves have already proven to preserve DNA for thousands of years. The amount of recovered sequences from environmental sediments, however, is generally low, which difficults the analyses to be performed with these sequences. A study led by Ron Pinhasi and Pere Gelabert of the University of Vienna and published in Current Biology successfully retrieved three mammalian environmental genomes from a single soil sample of 25,000 years bp obtained from the cave of Satsurblia in the Caucasus (Georgia).

Life Sciences - Health - 06.07.2021
Bacterial survival kit to endure in soil
Bacterial survival kit to endure in soil
Soil bacteria have amazing strategies to attain energy in order to withstand stressful times Soils are one of the most diverse habitats on the planet. There are more than thousand microbial species per gram that significantly influence numerous environmental processes. However, the majority of these organisms are believed to be in a state of 'dormancy' due to environmental stress, such as nutrient-poor conditions.

Life Sciences - 29.06.2021
The evolution of axial patterning
The evolution of axial patterning
Similarity in axis formation of sea anemones and sea urchins provides insight into axis formation in prehistoric animals Body axes are molecular coordinate systems along which regulatory genes are activated. These genes then activate the development of anatomical structures in correct locations in the embryo.

Life Sciences - 23.06.2021
Asian elephants do more than just trumpet- they buzz their lips to squeak
Asian elephants do more than just trumpet- they buzz their lips to squeak
The animals' sound production does not only come from the trunk Communication is crucial for elephants that live in complex multi-tiered social systems. Apart from their iconic trumpets uttered through the trunk, Asian elephants also produce species-specific squeaks by buzzing their lips. This demonstrates once again the elephant's flexibility in sound production.

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