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Life Sciences - May 10
Life Sciences
How do simple creatures manage to move to a specific place? Artificial intelligence and a physical model from TU Wien can now explain this. How is it possible to move in the desired direction without a brain or nervous system? Single-celled organisms apparently manage this feat without any problems: for example, they can swim towards food with the help of small flagellar tails.
Life Sciences - May 5
Life Sciences

T cells use their antigen receptors like sticky fingers - a team from TU Wien and MedUni Vienna was able to observe them doing so.

Physics - Apr 26
Physics

Is it possible to transmit information through a material in the form of electron spins? New measurements show: not in the way that scientists had been working on for decades.

Physics - Apr 29
Physics

The acidity of molecules can be easily determined, but until now it was not possible to measure this important property for atoms on a surface.

Paleontology - Apr 20
Paleontology

In a new study, an international team led by Sebastian Stumpf from the University of Vienna describes a fossil skeleton of an ancient shark, which is assigned to a new, previously unknown genus and species.


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Life Sciences - Computer Science - 10.05.2021
Reaching your life goals as a single-celled organism
Reaching your life goals as a single-celled organism
How do simple creatures manage to move to a specific place? Artificial intelligence and a physical model from TU Wien can now explain this. How is it possible to move in the desired direction without a brain or nervous system? Single-celled organisms apparently manage this feat without any problems: for example, they can swim towards food with the help of small flagellar tails.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 05.05.2021
Tracking down the tiniest of forces: how T cells detect invaders
Tracking down the tiniest of forces: how T cells detect invaders
T cells use their antigen receptors like sticky fingers - a team from TU Wien and MedUni Vienna was able to observe them doing so. T-cells play a central role in our immune system: by means of their so-called T-cell receptors (TCR) they make out dangerous invaders or cancer cells in the body and then trigger an immune reaction.

Physics - Chemistry - 29.04.2021
How acidic are atoms?
How acidic are atoms?
The acidity of molecules can be easily determined, but until now it was not possible to measure this important property for atoms on a surface. With a new microscopy technique from the Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), this has now been achieved. The degree of acidity or alkalinity of a substance is crucial for its chemical behavior.

Physics - Electroengineering - 26.04.2021
New measurements call spin liquids into question
New measurements call spin liquids into question
Is it possible to transmit information through a material in the form of electron spins? New measurements show: not in the way that scientists had been working on for decades. It is an old dream of solid-state physics: "spin liquids" are a hypothetical state of matter with exotic magnetic properties.

Paleontology - 20.04.2021
New ancient shark discovered
New ancient shark discovered
In a new study, an international team led by Sebastian Stumpf from the University of Vienna describes a fossil skeleton of an ancient shark, which is assigned to a new, previously unknown genus and species. This rare fossil find comes from the Kimmeridge Clay Formation in England, a series of sedimentary rocks that was formed in a shallow, tropical-subtropical sea during the Upper Jurassic, about 150 million years ago.

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.04.2021
Of Apples and Oil Pumpkins: News from Microbiome Research
Of Apples and Oil Pumpkins: News from Microbiome Research
The extent to which the composition of the microbiome of apples and oil pumpkins depends on the geographical location and what insights can be derived from this for breeding, health and shelf life of the fruits is shown in two recent publications by researchers at TU Graz. Additional pictures for download at the end in the text We refer to the microbiome as the community of microorganisms that exist in or on all organisms, including bacteria and fungi.

History / Archeology - 13.04.2021
Childbirth versus pelvic floor stability: An evolutionary history of compromises
Childbirth versus pelvic floor stability: An evolutionary history of compromises
Human childbirth is comparatively difficult because our babies' heads are large relative to our birth canals. This tight "fetopelvic" fit increases the risk of obstructed labor, which in turn has potentially dire outcomes for both mother and child. It has long been thought that bipedalism prevents further widening of the human pelvis.

Innovation - 13.04.2021
3D-printed Material to Replace Ivory
3D-printed Material to Replace Ivory
With an elephant-friendly alternative to ivory, developed by TU Wien and Cubicure, old artefacts can be restored with high precision. For centuries, ivory was often used to make art objects. But to protect elephant populations, the ivory trade was banned internationally in 1989. To restore ivory parts of old art objects, one must therefore resort to substitute materials - such as bones, shells or plastic.

Physics - 12.04.2021
The indestructible light beam
The indestructible light beam
Researchers at Utrecht University and at TU Wien (Vienna) create special light waves that can penetrate even opaque materials as if the material was not even there. Why is sugar not transparent? Because light that penetrates a piece of sugar is scattered, altered and deflected in a highly complicated way.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.04.2021
Popeye with a whiff of rotten eggs
Popeye with a whiff of rotten eggs
A sulfosugar from green vegetables promotes the growth of important gut bacteria An international team of scientists led by microbiologists Alexander Loy from the University of Vienna and David Schleheck from the University of Konstanz has uncovered new metabolic capabilities of gut bacteria. For the first time, the researchers have analyzed how microbes in the gut process the plant-based, sulfur-containing sugar sulfoquinovose.

Physics - 31.03.2021
Heat conduction record with tantalum nitride
Heat conduction record with tantalum nitride
How can we remove heat from computer chips as fast as possible' At TU Wien, a metal compound has now been identified that is particularly well suited for this purpose. A thermos bottle has the task of preserving the temperature - but sometimes you want to achieve the opposite: Computer chips generate heat that must be dissipated as quickly as possible so that the chip is not destroyed.

Physics - Materials Science - 28.03.2021
Electromagnetic Fields of Nanostructures Visualized in 3D for the First Time
Electromagnetic Fields of Nanostructures Visualized in 3D for the First Time
Researchers at TU Graz and the University of Graz, together with experts from France, have succeeded in imaging surface phonons in 3D for the first time. This success could accelerate the development of new, efficient nanotechnologies. Whether for microscopy, data storage or sensor technology, many advanced technological applications that require specific functions rely on the structure of the electromagnetic field near the surfaces of materials.

Environment - 26.03.2021
The persistent danger after landscape fires
The persistent danger after landscape fires
Carbonized plants contain harmful free radicals Every year, an estimated four percent of the world's vegetated land surface burns, leaving more than 250 megatons of carbonized plants behind. For the first time, a study by the University of Vienna has now recorded elevated concentrations of environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFR) in these charcoals - in some cases even up to five years after the fire.

History / Archeology - 24.03.2021
Older than expected: Teeth reveal the origin of the tiger shark
Older than expected: Teeth reveal the origin of the tiger shark
With a total length of up to 5.5m, the tiger shark is one of the largest predatory sharks known today. This shark is a cosmopolitan species occurring in all oceans worldwide. It is characterized by a striped pattern on its back, which is well marked in juveniles but usually fades in adults.

Physics - 23.03.2021
Moiré effect: How to twist material properties
Moiré effect: How to twist material properties
2D materials have triggered a boom in materials research. Now it turns out that exciting effects occur when two such layered materials are stacked and slightly twisted. The discovery of the material graphene, which consists of only one layer of carbon atoms, was the starting signal for a global race: Today, so-called "2D materials" are produced, made of different types of atoms.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.03.2021
Agricultural biodiversity
Agricultural biodiversity
International survey shows different perceptions in science and practice To minimize negative impacts of agriculture on biodiversity and related ecosystem services, "biodiversity-friendly" management is needed. Why scientific results are rarely translated into agricultural practice could be explained by their different perceptions of agricultural biodiversity, according to the results of a recent survey of European scientists and farmers.

Earth Sciences - 18.03.2021
TU Graz Researchers Identify Chemical Processes as Key to Understanding Landslides
TU Graz Researchers Identify Chemical Processes as Key to Understanding Landslides
The study results are based on investigations of repeated mass movements and are expected to benefit planning, maintenance, and development of transportation infrastructure in affected areas. Mass movements such as landslides and hill-slope debris flows cause billions of euros in economic damage around the world every year.

Health - Psychology - 15.03.2021
Fear of COVID-19 : Psychological, not environmental factors are important
Fear of COVID-19 : Psychological, not environmental factors are important
During pandemics, protective behaviors need to be motivated by effective communication. A critical factor in understanding a population's response to such a threat is the fear it elicits, since fear both contributes to motivating protective responses, but can also lead to panic-driven behaviors. Furthermore, lockdown measures affect well-being, making it important to identify protective factors that help to maintain high perceived levels of health during restrictions.

Physics - Materials Science - 15.03.2021
How do good metals go bad?
How do good metals go bad?
New measurements have solved a mystery in solid state physics: How is it that certain metals do not seem to adhere to the valid rules? We all have a clear picture in mind when we think of metals: We think of solid, unbreakable objects that conduct electricity and exhibit a typical metallic sheen. The behaviour of classical metals, for example their electrical conductivity, can be explained with well-known, well-tested physical theories.

Environment - 11.03.2021
Fossilized feeding frenzy: 47 million year old fly found with a full belly
Fossilized feeding frenzy: 47 million year old fly found with a full belly
An international team of scientists with Fridgeir Grímsson from the University of Vienna has found a previously unknown fossil fly species in old lake sediments of the Messel Pit, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Germany. In the stomach of the fossil insect, pollen from various plants could be detected, which allows rare insights into the feeding behavior, the ecology and the role of the fly as a pollinator.
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