Physics - Jan 20
Physics
A new, extremely efficient source of terahertz radiation has been developed at TU Wien (Vienna): Lasers turn air into plasma, thereby producing terahertz rays for many possible applications. Terahertz radiation is used for security checks at airports, for medical examinations and also for quality checks in industry.
Physics - Jan 17
Physics

For years, a new synthesis method has been developed at TU Wien (Vienna) to unlock the secrets of "strange metals".

Chemistry - Jan 8
Chemistry

Physicists at the University of Vienna in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have discovered a new type of glass formed by long, cyclic molecules.

Physics - Jan 13
Physics

An international team of researchers from the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the University of Vienna established a quantum encrypted connection between Sicily and Malta via a submarine cable.

Astronomy - Jan 7
Astronomy

Interconnected stellar nurseries form the largest gaseous structure ever observed in the Milky Way galaxy.


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Results 1 - 20 of 32.


Physics - Materials Science - 20.01.2020
Record-breaking Terahertz Laser Beam
Record-breaking Terahertz Laser Beam
A new, extremely efficient source of terahertz radiation has been developed at TU Wien (Vienna): Lasers turn air into plasma, thereby producing terahertz rays for many possible applications. Terahertz radiation is used for security checks at airports, for medical examinations and also for quality checks in industry.

Physics - Materials Science - 17.01.2020
A New Look at
A New Look at "Strange Metals"
For years, a new synthesis method has been developed at TU Wien (Vienna) to unlock the secrets of "strange metals". Now a breakthrough has been achieved. The results have been published in "Science". Superconductors allow electrical current to flow without any resistance - but only below a certain critical temperature.

Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 13.01.2020
Quantum encryption realized under the sea
Quantum encryption realized under the sea
An international team of researchers from the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the University of Vienna established a quantum encrypted connection between Sicily and Malta via a submarine cable. The record distance of 192 kilometres was a further step in the development of a secure quantum internet.

Chemistry - Physics - 08.01.2020
A new form of glass through molecular entanglement
A new form of glass through molecular entanglement
Physicists at the University of Vienna in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have discovered a new type of glass formed by long, cyclic molecules. The scientists successfully demonstrated that by making parts of the rings more mobile, the rings become more strongly entangled and the molecular fluid glassifies.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science / Telecom - 07.01.2020
The giant in our stars
The giant in our stars
Interconnected stellar nurseries form the largest gaseous structure ever observed in the Milky Way galaxy. Astronomers of the University of Vienna and Harvard University have discovered a monolithic, wave-shaped gaseous structure - the largest ever seen in our galaxy - made up of interconnected stellar nurseries.

Physics - 18.11.2019
A Remote Control for Everything Small
A Remote Control for Everything Small
Atoms, molecules or even living cells can be manipulated with light beams. At TU Wien a method was developed to revolutionize such "optical tweezers". They are reminiscent of the "tractor beam" in Star Trek: special light beams can be used to manipulate molecules or small biological particles. Even viruses or cells can be captured or moved.

Physics - Materials Science - 14.11.2019
New Material Breaks World Record Turning Heat into Electricity
New Material Breaks World Record Turning Heat into Electricity
A new type of material generates electrical current very efficiently from temperature differences. This allows sensors and small processors to supply themselves with energy wirelessly. Thermoelectric materials can convert heat into electrical energy. This is due to the so-called Seebeck effect: If there is a temperature difference between the two ends of such a material, electrical voltage can be generated and current can start to flow.

Environment - 12.11.2019
Applying biodiversity conservation research in practice
Applying biodiversity conservation research in practice
One million species are threatened with extinction, many of them already in the coming decades. This unprecedented loss of biodiversity threatens valuable ecosystems and human well-being. But what is holding us back from putting conservation research into practice? The journal Biological Conservation has published a collection of 14 articles on this topic.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 07.11.2019
Ancient Rome: a 12,000-year history of genetic flux, migrations and diversity
Ancient Rome: a 12,000-year history of genetic flux, migrations and diversity
Scholars have been all over Rome for hundreds of years, but it still holds some secrets - for instance, relatively little is known about where the city's denizens actually came from. Now, an international team led by Researchers from the University of Vienna, Stanford University and Sapienza University of Rome, is filling in the gaps with a genetic history that shows just how much the Eternal City's populace mirrored its sometimes tumultuous history.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 04.11.2019
From cone snail venom to pain relief
From cone snail venom to pain relief
Conotoxins are bioactive peptides found in the venom that marine cone snails produce for prey capture and defense. They are used as pharmacological tools to study pain signalling and have the potential to become a new class of analgesics. To date, more than 10,000 conotoxin sequences have been discovered.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.10.2019
Atomic images reveal unusually many neighbors for some oxygen atoms
Atomic images reveal unusually many neighbors for some oxygen atoms
The identification of new chemical bonds is crucial for the design of new material structures. A team led by Jani Kotakoski at the University of Vienna and Jannik Meyer at the University of Tübingen has found unexpected new configurations of oxygen and nitrogen in graphene. Direct images of the actual atoms and the analysis of Life as we know it is based on just a handful of different types of atoms (called elements), among them carbon, nitrogen and oxygen.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 21.10.2019
Bioprinting: Living cells in a 3D printer
Bioprinting: Living cells in a 3D printer
With a new process developed at TU Wien (Vienna), living cells can be integrated into fine structures created in a 3D printer - extremely fast and with very high resolution. Tissue growth and the behavior of cells can be controlled and investigated particularly well by embedding the cells in a delicate 3D framework.

Physics - Chemistry - 16.10.2019
Atomic force microscopy: new sensing element for high-speed imaging
Atomic force microscopy: new sensing element for high-speed imaging
Researchers at TU Wien have developed a new type of sensing element for atomic force microscopy, which enables a high measurement speed and can even image sensitive processes in living cells. High-definition images of minute objects are standard these days including the imaging of bacteria and viruses, and even molecules and individual atoms in extremely fine details.

Physics - Materials Science - 15.10.2019
Solving the Mystery of Quantum Light in Thin Layers
Solving the Mystery of Quantum Light in Thin Layers
A very special kind of light is emitted by tungsten diselenide layers. The reason for this has been unclear. Now an explanation has been found at TU Wien (Vienna). It is an exotic phenomenon that nobody was able to explain for years: when energy is supplied to a thin layer of the material tungsten diselenide, it begins to glow in a highly unusual fashion.

Environment - Life Sciences - 10.10.2019
Placenta transit of an environmental estrogen
Placenta transit of an environmental estrogen
Researchers show path of zearalenone through the womb using new technology The human foetus is considered to be particularly sensitive to environmental contaminants. A team led by Benedikt Warth from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna and Tina Bürki from the Swiss Materials Science and Technology Institute, Empa, has now been able to demonstrate for the first time how the widespread food estrogen zearalenone behaves in the womb.

Chemistry - Physics - 04.10.2019
The fast dance of electron spins
The fast dance of electron spins
Chemists investigate the interactions of metal complexes and light Metal complexes show a fascinating behavior in their interactions with light, which for example is utilized in organic light emitting diodes, solar cells, quantum computers, or even in cancer therapy. In many of these applications, the electron spin, a kind of inherent rotation of the electrons, plays an important role.

Life Sciences - Palaeontology - 02.10.2019
Fossil fish gives new insights into the evolution
Fossil fish gives new insights into the evolution
"An experiment of nature" after the end-Cretaceous mass extinction An international research team led by Giuseppe Marramà from the Institute of Paleontology of the University of Vienna discovered a new and well-preserved fossil stingray with an exceptional anatomy, which greatly differs from living species.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 02.10.2019
Quantum Vacuum: Less than Zero Energy
Quantum Vacuum: Less than Zero Energy
Is it possible to borrow energy from an empty space? And if yes, do we have to give it back? Energy values smaller than zero are allowed - at least within certain limits. Energy is a quantity that must always be positive - at least that's what our intuition tells us. If every single particle is removed from a certain volume until there is nothing left that could possibly carry energy, then a limit has been reached.

Physics - 01.10.2019
A metronome for quantum particles
A metronome for quantum particles
A new measurement protocol, developed at TU Wien (Vienna), makes it possible to measure the quantum phase of electrons - an important step for attosecond physics. It is like a microscope for time: Today's methods of attosecond physic allows us to measure extremely short time intervals. With the help of short laser pulses, physical processes can be investigated on a time scale of attoseconds - that is billionths of a billionth of a second.

Physics - Chemistry - 23.09.2019
2000 atoms in two places at once
2000 atoms in two places at once
The quantum superposition principle has been tested on a scale as never before in a new study by scientists at the University of Vienna in collaboration with the University of Basel. Hot, complex molecules composed of nearly two thousand atoms were brought into a quantum superposition and made to interfere.

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