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Results 21 - 40 of 100.


Health - Life Sciences - 16.10.2017
Germ-free hatching eggs: An alternative to formaldehyde application
Germ-free hatching eggs: An alternative to formaldehyde application
Hatching eggs in large-scale hatcheries are currently treated with formaldehyde to eliminate germs. Researchers from TU Graz, acib and Roombiotic have now developed a natural alternative. There was a Europe-wide outcry in the summer of 2017 as it emerged that hatching eggs were being treated with the insecticide fipronil, which is harmful to health.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.10.2017
Risk of Caesarean section is heritable
Risk of Caesarean section is heritable
Women born by Caesarean section due to a fetopelvic disproportion (FDP) are more than twice as likely to develop FDP when giving birth than women born naturally. This is the conclusion of a study by a team of evolutionary biologists at the University of Vienna headed by Philipp Mitteroecker. Using a mathematical model, the team was able to explain the paradoxical phenomenon that natural selection did not lead to the reduction in the rates of obstructed labour.

Psychology - 13.10.2017
Quality of life in the best light
Quality of life in the best light
By Ulrike Keller In TU Graz's LightLab, an interdisciplinary team from the fields of architecture, light design and psychology are conducting research on the lighting systems of the future in close collaboration with the lighting industry. Light isn't just here so we can see things. Due to scientific findings of the last ten years, we know today that light controls our internal clock and thus also our cognitive and psychological functions, such as mood, performance and concentration by means of photosensitive receptors in the eye.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 12.10.2017
Enzymes at work: breaking down stubborn cellulose
Enzymes at work: breaking down stubborn cellulose
TU Graz researchers observe enzymes breaking down cellulose to aid the production of biofuels. The results are now published in Nature Communications. Biofuels obtained from biomass are becoming increasingly important. Apart from biomethane, however, they cannot be produced efficiently, cheaply and sustainably since the current technological complexity and costs are still too high.

Life Sciences - 10.10.2017
Sharing of science is most likely among male scientists
Sharing of science is most likely among male scientists
Even though science is becoming increasingly competitive, scientists are still very willing to share their work with colleagues. This is especially true for male scientists among each other and less so for females among each other or between the sexes. These patterns of sharing among scientists were discovered by a team of Austrian, Dutch and German researchers led by Jorg Massen of the Department of Cognitive Biology at the University of Vienna, and the results of their study have been published in the scientific journal "Scientific Reports".

Health - Innovation - 28.09.2017
Making surgical screws from bones
Making surgical screws from bones
Biomechanics from TU Graz are developing surgical screws from donated human bone material for foot and jaw surgery in a project together with surgebright, a start-up from Linz. To heal broken bones using medical help, the surgical method of choice for decades have been metal screws, mainly made of titanium or stainless steel.

Chemistry - Physics - 26.09.2017
Artificial intelligence for obtaining chemical fingerprints
Artificial intelligence for obtaining chemical fingerprints
Researchers at the Universities of Vienna and Göttingen have succeeded in developing a method for predicting molecular infrared spectra based on artificial intelligence. These chemical "fingerprints" could only be simulated by common prediction techniques for small molecules in high quality. With the help of the new technology, which is based on neuronal networks similar to the human brain and is therefore capable of learning, the team led by Philipp Marquetand from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna was able to carry out simulations that were previously not possible.

Physics - Chemistry - 25.09.2017
Searching for the best 3D-printing materials
Searching for the best 3D-printing materials
TU Wien is conducting research into high-precision 3D printing technology. Now, a new method is enabling researchers to look for suitable materials with greater precision than ever. How is it possible to build a model of St Stephen's Cathedral the size of a dust particle' Well, using TU Wien's modern 3D-printing technology, this is no longer a problem.

Life Sciences - Environment - 18.09.2017
A Cereal survives heat and drought
A Cereal survives heat and drought
Pearl millet genome sequence provides a resource to improve agronomic traits in extreme environments An international consortium under the lead of the non-profit organization "International Crops Res

Art and Design - Life Sciences - 13.09.2017
When music makes male faces more attractive
When music makes male faces more attractive
Women rate photographs of male faces as more attractive and are more likely to date the men pictured when they have previously heard music. Moreover, highly arousing music led to the largest effect on sexual attraction. A team of psychologists led by Manuela Marin (University of Innsbruck) and Helmut Leder (University of Vienna) explains the significance of this finding in relation to the origins of music in their latest publication in the scientific journal PLOS ONE.

Physics - Mathematics - 13.09.2017
The Beam of Invisibility
The Beam of Invisibility
A new cloaking technology has been developed at TU Wien: a special kind of material is irradiated from above in such a way that another beam of light can pass completely uninhibited. The material is irradiated with a specially designed pattern, the wave from the left can pass through the object completely unperturbed.

Life Sciences - 11.09.2017
The evolutionary origin of the gut
The evolutionary origin of the gut
How did the gut, the skin and musculature evolve? This question concerns scientists for more than a century.

Physics - Chemistry - 11.09.2017
Hollow Atoms: The Consequences of an Underestimated Effect
Hollow Atoms: The Consequences of an Underestimated Effect
A riddle, which has been bugging atomic physicists for more than 20 years, has been solved. The solution should help to understand the helpful effects of ionizing radiation in cancer therapy. A highly charged ion (center) passing through graphene can transfer energy to several carbon atoms simultaneously.

Life Sciences - 06.09.2017
Brain Composer:
Brain Composer: "thinking" melodies onto a musical score
TU Graz researchers develop new brain-computer interface application which allows music to be composed by the power of thought. How this works is shown in the current issue of the journal PLOS ONE. Brain-computer interfaces, known as BCI, can replace bodily functions to a certain degree. Thanks to BCI, physically impaired persons can control special prostheses through the power of their minds, surf in internet and write emails.

Physics - Computer Science - 06.09.2017
New tool for characterizing quantum simulators
New tool for characterizing quantum simulators
Physicsts are developing quantum simulators, to help solve problems that are beyond the reach of conventional computers. However, they first need new tools to ensure that the simulators work properly. Innsbruck researchers around Rainer Blatt and Christian Roos, together with researchers from the Universities of Ulm and Strathclyde, have now implemented a new technique in the laboratory that can be used to efficiently characterize the complex states of quantum simulators.

Life Sciences - Veterinary - 06.09.2017
Getting hook bending off the hook
Getting hook bending off the hook
The bending of a hook into wire to fish for the handle of a basket by the crow Betty 15 years ago stunned the scientific world. However, the finding was recently relegated as similar behavioural routines were discovered in the natural repertoire of the same species, suggesting the possibility that Betty's tool manufacture was less intelligent than previously believed.

Electroengineering - Health - 04.09.2017
Electrical current provides a look inside the lungs
Electrical current provides a look inside the lungs
A new imaging technique, Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT), will soon be used to monitor important bodily functions. A collaborative project between TU Wien, the Medical University of Vienna and the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, has enabled significant progress to be made with this technology.

Pharmacology - Innovation - 01.09.2017
Inkjet Pharmacy: On-demand Drugs from the Printer
By Ulrike Keller In the near future, orodispersible films could replace pills: scientists at the Research Center Pharmaceutical Engineering are developing printing technologies to create personalized dosage forms for individual patient needs on demand. "Would you print out this prescription?" In the future, pharmacists could hear this question more frequently and could react in a different way than we would expect today.

Career - 25.08.2017
24 hours instead of 42 kilometres: Innovation Marathon in Alpbach
24 hours instead of 42 kilometres: Innovation Marathon in Alpbach
Working 24 hours non-stop on real-life problems set by companies and proving the power of innovation at the Alpbach Technology Symposium.

Physics - 23.08.2017
New ERC grant - using mercury to explain the universe
New ERC grant - using mercury to explain the universe
Simon Stellmer has been awarded a prestigious ERC Starting Grant. He will now use ultracold mercury atoms to investigate fundamental symmetries in nature. Why is there matter in the universe at all? To date there has been no conclusive answer to this question. Our understanding of the Big Bang is based on the assumption that equal amounts of antimatter and matter were created.