news 2017


Category


Years
2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012


Results 61 - 80 of 85.


Innovation - 26.04.2017
Metabolic disorders: University of Graz and TU Graz
Metabolic disorders: University of Graz and TU Graz "research studio"
The agent Atglistatin can reduce the level of fatty acid in the blood. Funded by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency, researchers at the University of Graz and TU Graz want to further develop the agent into a medicine to treat metabolic disorders. Worldwide, some 1.9 billion persons are overweight.

Physics - 21.04.2017
Quantum mechanics is complex enough, for now
Quantum mechanics is complex enough, for now
Physicists have searched for deviations from standard quantum mechanics, testing whether quantum mechanics requires a more complex set of mathematical rules. To do so a research team led by Philip Walther at the University of Vienna designed a new photonic experiment using exotic metamaterials, which were fabricated at the University of California Berkeley.

Innovation - Chemistry - 18.04.2017
Hand scanner measures bitumen quality
Hand scanner measures bitumen quality
Asphalt does not last forever. At some point, it ages and starts to crumble. This has to do with the bitumen, the sticky binding agent, which holds and keeps the rock content in the asphalt. Bitumen is a petroleum product consisting of several organic components, which undergo a chemical change over time.

Physics - 12.04.2017
Unveiling nonlocal correlations in natural systems
Nonlocal correlations are a quantum phenomenon that constitute a stronger form of correlations than quantum entanglement. Researchers at MPQ, ICFO, University of Innsbruck and the Center for Theoretical Physics PAS have developed a new method to show that the low energy states of some physical spin Hamiltonians can exhibit these nonlocal correlations.

Physics - Innovation - 12.04.2017
Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms
Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms
Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although - or often more precisely because - they are made up of just one or a few layers of atoms. Graphene is the best-known 2D material. Molybdenum disulphide (a layer consisting of molybdenum and sulphur atoms that is three-atoms thick) also falls in this category, although, unlike graphene, it has semiconductor properties.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 11.04.2017
Stress can increase empathy
Stress can increase empathy
Acute psychosocial stress leads to increased empathy and prosocial behavior. An international team of researchers led by Claus Lamm from the University of Vienna investigated the effects of stress on neural mechanisms and tested the relationship between empathy and prosocial behavior in a new experiment.

Physics - Innovation - 10.04.2017
Diamonds coupled using quantum physics
Diamonds coupled using quantum physics
Diamonds with minute flaws could play a crucial role in the future of quantum technology. For some time now, researchers at TU Wien have been studying the quantum properties of such diamonds, but only now have they succeeded in coupling the specific defects in two such diamonds with one another. This is an important prerequisite for the development of new applications, such as highly sensitive sensors and switches for quantum computers.

Physics - Electroengineering - 29.03.2017
Quantum Communication: How to Outwit Noise
Quantum Communication: How to Outwit Noise
Nowadays we communicate via radio signals and send electrical pulses through long cables. This could change soon, however: Scientists have been working intensely on developing methods for quantum information transfer. This would enable tap-proof data transfer or, one day, even the linking of quantum computers.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 28.03.2017
How does Oxygen get into a Fuel Cell?
How does Oxygen get into a Fuel Cell?
In order for a fuel cell to work, it needs an oxidising agent. TU Wien has now found a way to explain why oxygen does not always enter fuel cells effectively, rendering them unusable. Fuel cells use a simple chemical reaction, such as the combination of oxygen and hydrogen to form water, to generate electricity.

Physics - 24.03.2017
In a quantum race everyone is both a winner and a loser
In a quantum race everyone is both a winner and a loser
Our understanding of the world is mostly built on basic perceptions, such as that events follow each other in a well-defined order. Such definite orders are required in the macroscopic world, for which the laws of classical physics apply. However, in the quantum world orders can be ‘scrambled'.

Life Sciences - 23.03.2017
Ravens: Non-breeders live in highly dynamic social groups
Ravens: Non-breeders live in highly dynamic social groups
Ravens have impressive cognitive skills when interacting with conspecifics - comparable to many primates, whose social intelligence has been related to their life in groups. An international collaboration of researchers led by Thomas Bugnyar, Professor at the Department of Cognitive Biology, University of Vienna, could uncover for the first time the group dynamics of non-breeding ravens.

Health - 22.03.2017
Protective switch to treat obesity
Protective switch to treat obesity
Scientists at the University of Graz and TU Graz have developed an active ingredient that reduces obesity and can prevent type II diabetes as well as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), around 1.9 billion people are overweight worldwide. 75 per cent suffer from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and 400 million have type II diabetes.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.03.2017
How do metals interact with DNA?
How do metals interact with DNA?
Since a couple of decades, metal-containing drugs have been successfully used to fight against certain types of cancer. The lack of knowledge about the underlying molecular mechanisms slows down the search for new and more efficient chemotherapeutic agents. An international team of scientists, led by Leticia González from the University of Vienna and Jacinto Sá from the Uppsala University, have developed a protocol that is able to detect how metal-based drugs interact with DNA.

Physics - 14.03.2017
Why do people switch their language?
Why do people switch their language?
Due to increasing globalization, the linguistic landscape of our world is changing; many people give up use of one language in favour of another, a phenomenon called language shift. Katharina Prochazka and Gero Vogl from the University of Vienna have studied why language shift happens using the example of southern Carinthia, Austria.

Physics - Chemistry - 13.03.2017
Using molecules to detune nanodrums
Using molecules to detune nanodrums
The analysis of the minutest quantities of pharmaceutical samples is of crucial importance for the research and synthesis of new medications. At the moment it represents a technical challenge, but a new infrared method of measurement developed by TU Wien in collaboration with two research groups from Copenhagen may remedy this.

Physics - 09.03.2017
"Blurred Times" in a Quantum World
When measuring time, we normally assume that clocks do not affect space and time, and that time can be measured with infinite accuracy at nearby points in space. However, combining quantum mechanics and Einstein's theory of general relativity theoretical physicists from the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences have demonstrated a fundamental limitation for our ability to measure time.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 03.03.2017
Biological system with light switch: new findings from Graz
Biological system with light switch: new findings from Graz
For the first time ever, researchers at TU Graz and the Medical University of Graz have managed to functionally characterise the three-dimensional interaction between red-light receptors and enzymatic effectors. The results, with implications for optogenetics, have been published in Science Advances.

Mathematics - 27.02.2017
Who can find the fish that makes the best sound?
Who can find the fish that makes the best sound?
Using new computer algorithms, it is possible to adjust specific properties of three-dimensional objects, such as the sounds they produce or how stable they are. The thickness of a piece of metal made into different animal shapes - including a giraffe and a fish - is adjusted by using a computer algorithm in such a way that a specific sound spectrum is exhibited when the objects are struck.

Astronomy / Space Science - 22.02.2017
Four years in space: Austrian BRITE satellites
Four years in space: Austrian BRITE satellites
TUGSAT-1 and UniBRITE have been in space since 2013. During this time 350 stars have been observed, new variable stars discovered, and 12 scientific papers published in international journals. The nanosats of the BRITE mission focus on the brightest, hottest and most massive stars in the immediate neighbourhood of the universe.

Physics - Life Sciences - 13.02.2017
New record achieved in terahertz pulse generation
New record achieved in terahertz pulse generation
A group of scientists from TU Wien and ETH Zurich have succeeded in their attempts to generate ultrashort terahertz light pulses.

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |