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Results 1 - 12 of 12.


Materials Science - Physics - 16.11.2022
Ceramic coatings do not fatigue
Ceramic coatings do not fatigue
What determines the durability of high-performance coatings for turbines or highly stressed tools? Surprising results from TU Wien show: It is not material fatigue. Extremely thin ceramic coatings can completely change the properties of technical components. Coatings are used, for example, to increase the resistance of metals to heat or corrosion.

Physics - Materials Science - 17.10.2022
Growth of Nanoholes Visible for the First Time Thanks to Helium Scattering
Growth of Nanoholes Visible for the First Time Thanks to Helium Scattering
By Birgit Baustädter Scientists at TU Graz in cooperation with the University of Surrey were able to observe and document the growth of hexagonal boron nitride for the first time. The material is mainly used in microelectronics and nanotechnology. Atomically thin 2D materials for applications in microelectronics or nanotechnology are grown by breaking down gas on a hot metal surface.

Materials Science - Physics - 10.10.2022
Topological Materials Become Switchable
Topological Materials Become Switchable
Because they are extremely stable, so-called "topological states" play an important role in materials research. Now, for the first time, it has been possible to switch such states on and off. A donut is not a breakfast roll. Those are two very clearly distinguishable objects: One has a hole, the other does not.

Materials Science - 06.09.2022
Faster friction - less wear
Faster friction - less wear
A seemingly paradoxical effect: friction normally causes more damage at higher speeds. But at extremely high speeds, it is the other way around. When two metal surfaces slide against each other, a variety of complicated phenomena occur that lead to friction and wear: Small crystalline regions, of which metals are typically composed, can be deformed, twisted or broken, or even fuse together.

Materials Science - 26.08.2022
A Perfect Trap for Light
At TU Wien (Vienna) and The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, a "light trap" was developed in which a beam of light prevents itself from escaping. This allows light to be absorbed perfectly. Whether in photosynthesis or in a photovoltaic system: if you want to use light efficiently, you have to absorb it as completely as possible.

Innovation - Materials Science - 13.07.2022
#3: Houses from the printer
#3: Houses from the printer
Will we soon be able to print out houses with a printer? Georg Hansemann, who works on 3D printing of components in the Robot Design Lab, answers these and many other questions. Talk Science To Me is the most curious science podcast in the podcast world - but especially at TU Graz. We ask the questions, and our researchers provide the answers.

Physics - Materials Science - 24.06.2022
'Hot' graphene reveals migration of carbon atoms
’Hot’ graphene reveals migration of carbon atoms
The migration of carbon atoms on the surface of the nanomaterial graphene was recently measured for the first time. Although the atoms move too swiftly to be directly observed with an electron microscope, their effect on the stability of the material can now be determined indirectly while the material is heated on a microscopic hot plate.

Materials Science - Physics - 16.05.2022
Electronic Skin: Physicist at TU Graz Develops Multisensory Hybrid Material
Electronic Skin: Physicist at TU Graz Develops Multisensory Hybrid Material
By Susanne Filzwieser The "smart skin" developed by Anna Maria Coclite is very similar to human skin. It senses pressure, humidity and temperature simultaneously and produces electronic signals. More sensitive robots or more intelligent prostheses are thus conceivable. Photographic material for Download at the end of the text The skin is the largest sensory organ and at the same time the protective coat of the human being.

Innovation - Materials Science - 20.04.2022
Graz Universities Present Austria's First Micro-CT Devices for In-Situ Measurements
Graz Universities Present Austria’s First Micro-CT Devices for In-Situ Measurements
By Christoph Pelzl The devices can be used to non-destructively observe and measure structural changes inside materials under real operating conditions. They were presented to the public by the inter-university Graz-µCT consortium on 20 April. What happens inside a piece of concrete when it comes into contact with acid?

Materials Science - Physics - 02.03.2022
Micro-CT Lab: Looking Deeply into Material Structures
Micro-CT Lab: Looking Deeply into Material Structures
By Birgit Baustädter Since the innovative Micro-CT Lab at TU Graz went into operation in 2022, researchers from TU Graz, the Uni Graz and the Med Uni Graz have been working together examining material structures. From the outside, the two new white cabinets are inconspicuous. Rather big. White. Each one with a viewing window and a sample stage.

Materials Science - Physics - 25.01.2022
Linear and 3D Defects in Piezoelectric Materials: Useful Imperfections
Linear and 3D Defects in Piezoelectric Materials: Useful Imperfections
By Jurij Koruza It is our imperfections that make us humans interesting. A similar statement can be made for many electroceramics. While oneand multidimensional defects are conventionally being avoided, we demonstrate that their selective use can lead to a strong enhancement of piezoelectric and dielectric properties.

Physics - Materials Science - 20.01.2022
Impossible material made possible inside a graphene sandwich
Impossible material made possible inside a graphene sandwich
Atoms bind together by sharing electrons. The way this happens depends on the atom types but also on conditions such as temperature and pressure. In two-dimensional (2D) materials, such as graphene, atoms join along a plane to form structures just one atom thick, which leads to fascinating properties determined by quantum mechanics.