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Materials Science - Physics - 24.11.2023
Strangely 'quiet' current in strange metal
Strangely ’quiet’ current in strange metal
What happens when electric current flows through a "strange metal"- TU Wien (Vienna) and Rice University (Texas) show: The established picture of electrons and "quasi-electrons" collapses. At first glance, it all sounds so simple: there are electrons in a cable, and when we apply a voltage, the electrons dash from one side of the cable to the other, and an electric current flows.

Physics - 21.11.2023
Limits for quantum computers: perfect clocks are impossible
Limits for quantum computers: perfect clocks are impossible
It is becoming increasingly possible to carry out calculations with quantum computers. However, calculations by TU Wien show that there are fundamental limits - namely the quality of the clock used . There are different ideas on how to build quantum computers. But they all have one thing in common: you use a quantum physical system - for example individual atoms - and change their state by exposing them to very specific forces for a very specific time.

Physics - Computer Science - 21.11.2023
Limits for quantum computers: Perfect clocks are impossible
It is becoming increasingly easier to carry out calculations with quantum computers. However, calculations show that there are fundamental limits - namely the quality of the clock used. There are different ideas about how quantum computers could be built. But they all have one thing in common: you use a quantum physical system - for example individual atoms - and change their state by exposing them to very specific forces for a specific time.

Chemistry - Physics - 20.11.2023
Two Conductors of a Chemical Reaction
Two Conductors of a Chemical Reaction
For the first time, researchers at TU Wien have successfully observed the operating principle of so-called promoters in a catalytic reaction in real-time. These promoters play an important role in technology, but so far there is only limited understanding of how they work. Catalysts are essential for numerous chemical technologies, ranging from exhaust gas purification to the production of valuable chemicals and energy carriers.

Pharmacology - Physics - 08.11.2023
Crystal structure: forecasts you can trust
Crystal structure: forecasts you can trust
An international team from science and industry has revolutionized the modelling and prediction of free energy in crystals. Their work on the new TRHu(ST) method, published in Nature , shows that the stability of crystal forms can be predicted reliably and cost-effectively under real temperature and humidity conditions.

Physics - Chemistry - 27.10.2023
Interacting polarons
Interacting polarons
In physics, the complex processes in solids are often described in terms of quasiparticles. In ultracold quantum gases, these quasiparticles can be reproduced and studied. Now, for the first time, Innsbruck scientists led by Rudolf Grimm have been able to observe in experiments how Fermi polarons - a special type of quasiparticle - can interact with each other.

Physics - 25.10.2023
Deep look into the dipo­lar quan­tum world
Deep look into the dipo­lar quan­tum world
In a groundbreaking collaboration, two world-leading research groups, one led by Francesca Ferlaino and one by Markus Greiner, have joined force to develop an advanced quantum gas microscope for magnetic quantum matter. This state-of-the-art instrument reveals intricate dipolar quantum phases shaped by the interactions as reported in Nature .

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 25.09.2023
Sta­ti­stics of the invi­si­ble
Sta­ti­stics of the invi­si­ble
In order to obtain information about dark matter and dark energy from the huge amounts of data to be generated by the new ESA probe Euclid, Innsbruck astrophysicist Laila Linke and her team are using novel statistical methods. As soon as Euclid sends its first data to Earth, the researchers intend to have a tool ready to gain new Astronomical measurements revealed that an unknown world lies hidden among all the pretty stars, nebulae and galaxies.

Physics - Electroengineering - 18.09.2023
Golden future for thermoelectrics
Golden future for thermoelectrics
Researchers at TU Wien discover excellent thermoelectric properties of nickel-gold alloys. These can be used to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy. Thermoelectrics enable the direct conversion of heat into electrical energy - and vice versa. This makes them interesting for a range of technological applications.

Physics - 30.08.2023
The Wild Boar Paradox - Finally Solved
The Wild Boar Paradox - Finally Solved
Decades after the Chernobyl nuclear accident, wild boar meat is still surprisingly radioactive. The solution to the riddle: an important other cause had been overlooked. The Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986 had a major impact on the forest ecosystem in Central Europe. After the accident, the consumption of mushrooms was discouraged because of the high radioactive contamination, and the meat of wild animals was also severely affected for several years.

Physics - Materials Science - 30.08.2023
Graphene: Perfection is futile
Graphene: Perfection is futile
The carbon material graphene has excellent electronic properties. But are they also stable enough to be useful in practice? Calculations from TU Wien say: Yes. Nothing in the world is perfect. This is also true in materials research. In computer simulations, one often represents a system in a highly idealized way; for example, one calculates the properties that an absolutely perfect crystal would have.

Physics - Chemistry - 23.08.2023
Scien­tists deve­lop fer­mio­nic quan­tum pro­ces­sor
Scien­tists deve­lop fer­mio­nic quan­tum pro­ces­sor
Researchers from Austria and USA have designed a new type of quantum computer that uses fermionic atoms to simulate complex physical systems. The processor uses programmable neutral atom arrays and is capable of simulating fermionic models in a hardware-efficient manner using fermionic gates. The team led by Peter Zoller demonstrated how the new quantum processor can efficiently simulate fermionic models from quantum chemistry and particle physics.

Physics - 16.08.2023
Magnonic computing: Faster spin waves could make novel computing systems possible
Magnonic computing: Faster spin waves could make novel computing systems possible
Breakthrough in research on novel energy-efficient computer Research is underway around the world to find alternatives to our current electronic computing technology, as great, electron-based systems have limitations. A new way of transmitting information is emerging from the field of magnonics: instead of electron exchange, the waves generated in magnetic media could be used for transmission, but magnonics-based computing has been (too) slow to date.

Physics - 07.08.2023
The quantum avalanche
The quantum avalanche
At the Vienna University of Technology, it was possible to keep a system that is actually very unstable, consisting of many quantum particles, stable and then release its energy in a targeted manner all at once . These are very special diamonds that are being worked with at TU Wien: Their crystal lattice is not perfectly regular, it contains numerous defects.

Physics - Materials Science - 02.08.2023
Hope for revolutionary high-temperature superconductor lives on
Hope for revolutionary high-temperature superconductor lives on
Calculations by TU Wien (Vienna) show: Newly discovered material LK-99 indeed has properties that could be advantageous for superconductivity. LK-99 is the name of the material that is being hotly debated around the world these days: A Korean research group published results at the end of July 2023 suggesting that it could be a superconductor even at room temperature and normal atmospheric pressure.

Physics - Materials Science - 02.08.2023
Hope for revolutionary high-temperature superconductor lives on
Hope for revolutionary high-temperature superconductor lives on
Calculations by TU Vienna show: Newly discovered material LK-99 actually has properties that could be advantageous for superconductivity . LK-99 is the name of the material that is being hotly debated around the world these days: A Korean research group published results at the end of July 2023 suggesting that it could be a superconductor that remains superconducting even at room temperature and normal atmospheric pressure, i.e. conducts electricity completely without electrical resistance.

Chemistry - Physics - 19.07.2023
New catalysts for solar hydrogen production
New catalysts for solar hydrogen production
Researchers at TU Wien are developing a layered photocatalyst that can be used to produce hydrogen very efficiently from water. Finding sustainable and clean fuels is crucial in today's global energy and climate crisis. One promising candidate that is increasingly gaining relevance is hydrogen. However, today's industrial hydrogen production still has a considerable CO2 footprint, especially considering processes like steam reforming or non-sustainable electrolysis.

Physics - 18.07.2023
Detecting nanoplastics - in fractions of a second
Detecting nanoplastics - in fractions of a second
Tiny plastic particles are an environmental problem. They can even penetrate living cells. A method has now been developed at TU Wien to detect such particles quickly and with high sensitivity. It is well known that microplastics are a problem: They are tiny, barely visible plastic particles that can harm the environment, for example, if they are eaten by animals.

Chemistry - Physics - 17.07.2023
Why our body runs like clockwork
Why our body runs like clockwork
The friction in our joints is extremely low - how is that physically possible at all? Measurements at TU Wien provide explanations and ideas for new treatment methods . Friction and wear as an eternal nuisance - this is as familiar in technology as it is in medicine. Whether it's a manual transmission or a knee joint, you always want moving parts to slide over each other with as little friction as possible, so that energy expenditure and wear are kept to a minimum.

Physics - 13.07.2023
Engineering dual carriageways for signals
New possibilities for controlling signal routing in quantum information processing Routing signals and isolating them against noise and back-reflections are essential in many practical situations in classical communication as well as in quantum processing. In a theory-experimental collaboration, a team led by Andreas Nunnenkamp from the University of Vienna and Ewold Verhagen based at the research institute AMOLF in Amsterdam has achieved unidirectional transport of signals in pairs of "one-way streets".