Of pits and shafts: Geotechnics conference at TU Graz

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Particularly deep and large excavations, as seen here at a construction site in

Particularly deep and large excavations, as seen here at a construction site in Doha, Qatar, pose some geotechnical challenges. Keller Holding GmbH

The Christian Veder Colloquium of TU Graz is dedicated to deep excavations and shaft structures. A particularly spectacular item in the programme includes the shafts for Africa’s biggest suspension bridge.

You couldn’t get much lower: more than 400 specialists discuss problems resulting from deep excavations and shafts at the 33rd Christian Veder Colloquium: deformation-critical neighbouring buildings in the urban environment and environmental aspects. The programme contributions of the geotechnics conference range from deep excavations in Salzburg’s inner city and six-storey construction cavities beside railway lines to excavations in a mineral spa protection zone. A particularly spectacular item in the programme deals with the foundation for Africa’s biggest suspension bridge to span Maputo Bay in south Mozambique, thus necessitating shafts more than 35 metres deep and 50 metres wide. Other topics at this year’s conference are digitalisation in geotechnics and Building Information Modeling (BIM).

Fixed event for geotechnical specialists

Since its founding in 1985, the Christian Veder Colloquium has established itself as an annual fixed event for geotechnical engineers in the German-speaking area. "The event serves primarily as an exchange of experience. For this reason ample time is reserved for discussion - a detail which differentiates us from many other conferences," according to the key person responsible for the conference, Helmut Schweiger of the Institute of Soil Mechanics, Foundation Engineering and Computational Geotechnics of TU Graz. The Christian Veder Colloquium is organised by the Institute of Soil Mechanics, Foundation Engineering and Computational Geotechnics of TU Graz in cooperation with the Institute of Rock Mechanics and Tunnelling and the Institute of Applied Geosciences, both also of TU Graz.


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