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Physics - 31.03.2021
Heat conduction record with tantalum nitride
Heat conduction record with tantalum nitride
How can we remove heat from computer chips as fast as possible' At TU Wien, a metal compound has now been identified that is particularly well suited for this purpose. A thermos bottle has the task of preserving the temperature - but sometimes you want to achieve the opposite: Computer chips generate heat that must be dissipated as quickly as possible so that the chip is not destroyed.

Physics - Materials Science - 28.03.2021
Electromagnetic Fields of Nanostructures Visualized in 3D for the First Time
Electromagnetic Fields of Nanostructures Visualized in 3D for the First Time
Researchers at TU Graz and the University of Graz, together with experts from France, have succeeded in imaging surface phonons in 3D for the first time. This success could accelerate the development of new, efficient nanotechnologies. Whether for microscopy, data storage or sensor technology, many advanced technological applications that require specific functions rely on the structure of the electromagnetic field near the surfaces of materials.

Physics - 23.03.2021
Moiré effect: How to twist material properties
Moiré effect: How to twist material properties
2D materials have triggered a boom in materials research. Now it turns out that exciting effects occur when two such layered materials are stacked and slightly twisted. The discovery of the material graphene, which consists of only one layer of carbon atoms, was the starting signal for a global race: Today, so-called "2D materials" are produced, made of different types of atoms.

Physics - Materials Science - 15.03.2021
How do good metals go bad?
How do good metals go bad?
New measurements have solved a mystery in solid state physics: How is it that certain metals do not seem to adhere to the valid rules? We all have a clear picture in mind when we think of metals: We think of solid, unbreakable objects that conduct electricity and exhibit a typical metallic sheen. The behaviour of classical metals, for example their electrical conductivity, can be explained with well-known, well-tested physical theories.

Computer Science - Physics - 11.03.2021
Robots learn faster with quantum technology
Robots learn faster with quantum technology
Artificial intelligence is part of our modern life by enabling machines to learn useful processes such as speech recognition and digital personal assistants. A crucial question for practical applications is how fast such intelligent machines can learn. An experiment at the University of Vienna has answered this question, showing that quantum technology enables a speed-up in the learning process.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.03.2021
How a ladybug warps space-time
How a ladybug warps space-time
Vienna quantum physicists measure the smallest gravitational force yet Researchers at the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences, led by Markus Aspelmeyer have succeeded in measuring the gravitational field of a gold sphere, just 2 mm in diameter, using a highly sensitive pendulum - and thus the smallest gravitational force.

Physics - Life Sciences - 04.03.2021
New EU project 'ONEM' develops a unique hybrid imaging technique
New EU project ’ONEM’ develops a unique hybrid imaging technique
The ONEM project will develop a new non-invasive microscopy technique for imaging dynamic processes at interfaces, called Optical Near-field Electron Microscopy. Led by physicist Thomas Juffmann from the University of Vienna, ONEM - which has a budget of 3,7 million Euro - is one of only two proposals that succeeded in the topic "Measuring the Unmeasurable" of the call from the European Innovation Council.

Life Sciences - Physics - 26.02.2021
05.03.: Gastvortrag: Swarming Behaviour in Confinement - How curved surfaces influence pattern formation in biology
05.03.: Gastvortrag: Swarming Behaviour in Confinement - How curved surfaces influence pattern formation in biology
Am 05. März 2021 hält Univ. Prof. John W. C. Dunlop einen Vortrag zum Thema "Swarming Behaviour in Confinement - How curved surfaces influence pattern formation in biology." Der Vortrag findet um 14 Uhr online via Webex statt. Der Fachbereich Biowissenschaften lädt herzlich dazu ein! Univ.

Physics - Chemistry - 23.02.2021
Twin atoms: A source for entangled particles
Twin atoms: A source for entangled particles
Quantum experiments that could previously only be performed with photons are now also possible with atoms: Beams of entangled atoms have been produced at TU Wien (Vienna). Heads or tails? If we toss two coins into the air, the result of one coin toss has nothing to do with the result of the other. Coins are independent objects.

Physics - Materials Science - 22.02.2021
Magnetic effect without a magnet
Magnetic effect without a magnet
Surprise in solid-state physics: The Hall effect, which normally requires magnetic fields, can also be generated in a completely different way - with extreme strength. Electric current is deflected by a magnetic field - in conducting materials this leads to the so-called Hall effect. This effect is often used to measure magnetic fields.

Physics - Computer Science - 17.02.2021
Quantum computing: when ignorance is wanted
Quantum computing: when ignorance is wanted
Quantum technologies for computers open up new concepts of preserving the privacy of input and output data of a computation. Scientists from the University of Vienna, the Singapore University of Technology and Design and the Polytechnic University of Milan have shown that optical quantum systems are not only particularly suitable for some quantum computations, but can also effectively encrypt the associated input and output data.

Physics - 10.02.2021
Quantum effects help minimise communication flaws
Quantum effects help minimise communication flaws
Noise limits the performance of modern quantum technologies. However, particles traveling in a superposition of paths can bypass noise in communication. A collaboration between the Universities of Hong-Kong, Grenoble and Vienna, as well as the Austrian Academy of Sciences, under the lead of Philip Walther, reveals novel techniques to reduce noise in quantum communication.

Materials Science - Physics - 08.02.2021
Two-phase material with surprising properties
Two-phase material with surprising properties
Microstructure and macroscopic electro-mechanical properties are closely coupled in so-called ferroelectric polymers. An explanation for the high temperature dependence of this coupling has now been found at TU Wien. In certain materials, electrical and mechanical effects are closely linked: for example, the material may change its shape when an electrical field is applied or, conversely, an electrical field may be created when the material is deformed.

Physics - 25.01.2021
Optimal information about the invisible
Optimal information about the invisible
How do you measure objects that you can't see under normal circumstances? Utrecht University and TU Wien (Vienna) open up new possibilities with special light waves. Laser beams can be used to precisely measure an object's position or velocity. Normally, however, a clear, unobstructed view of this object is required - and this prerequisite is not always satisfied.

Chemistry - Physics - 22.01.2021
Single atoms as a catalyst: Surprising effects ensue
Single atoms as a catalyst: Surprising effects ensue
For years, the metal nanoparticles used in catalysts have been getting smaller and smaller. Now, a research team at TU Wien in Vienna, Austria have shown that everything is suddenly different when you arrive at the smallest possible size: a single atom. Metals such as gold or platinum are often used as catalysts.

Chemistry - Physics - 11.01.2021
Catalysts: Worth Taking a Closer Look
Catalysts: Worth Taking a Closer Look
Why do metal oxide surfaces behave differently? At TU Wien, a new research method was found to answer important questions. Metal surfaces play a role as catalysts for many important applications - from fuel cells to the purification of car exhaust gases. However, their behaviour is decisively affected by oxygen atoms incorporated into the surface.

Physics - Chemistry - 21.12.2020
The Mechanics of the Immune System
The Mechanics of the Immune System
When T-cells of our immune system become active, tiny traction forces at the molecular level play an important role. They have now been studied at TU Wien. Highly complicated processes constantly take place in our body to keep pathogens in check: The T-cells of our immune system are busy searching for antigens - suspicious molecules that fit exactly into certain receptors of the T-cells like a key into a lock.

Physics - Materials Science - 14.12.2020
When less is more: a single layer of atoms boosts the nonlinear generation of light
When less is more: a single layer of atoms boosts the nonlinear generation of light
A wide array of technologies, ranging from lasers and optical telecommunication to quantum computing rely on nonlinear optical interaction. Typically, these nonlinear interactions, which allow a beam of light, for example, to change its frequency, are implemented by bulk materials. In a new study an international research team led by the University of Vienna have shown that structures built around a single layer of graphene allow for strong optical nonlinearities that can convert light.

Physics - 02.12.2020
Learning about Quantum Vacuum by Studying Atoms
Learning about Quantum Vacuum by Studying Atoms
The Unruh-effect connects quantum theory and relativity. Until now, it could not be measured. A new idea could change this - in a completely different way than ever before. Is the vaccum really empty? Not necessarily. This is one of the strange results obtained by connecting quantum theory and the theory of relativity: The Unruh effect suggests that if you fly through a quantum vacuum with extreme acceleration, the vacuum no longer looks like a vacuum: rather, it looks like a warm bath full of particles.

Physics - Chemistry - 24.11.2020
Stable Catalysts for New Energy
Stable Catalysts for New Energy
Crucial new technologies such as hydrogen production or carbon capture require new catalysts. Experiments show: It's not just the material that matters, but also its atomic surface structure. On the way to a CO2-neutral economy, we need to perfect a whole range of technologies - including the electrochemical extraction of hydrogen from water, fuel cells, or carbon capture.
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