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Physics - Materials Science - 24.06.2022
'Hot' graphene reveals migration of carbon atoms
’Hot’ graphene reveals migration of carbon atoms
New study published in the scientific journal "Carbon" The migration of carbon atoms on the surface of the nanomaterial graphene was recently measured for the first time. Although the atoms move too swiftly to be directly observed with an electron microscope, their effect on the stability of the material can now be determined indirectly while the material is heated on a microscopic hot plate.

Physics - Life Sciences - 18.05.2022
Magnetic resonance makes the invisible visible
Magnetic resonance makes the invisible visible
Hyperpolarised water boosts signal intensities of proteins, DNA, and membranes A small group of researchers including Dennis Kurzbach from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna just published in "Nature Protocols" an advanced NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) method to monitor fast and complicated biomolecular events such as protein folding.

Physics - Computer Science - 24.03.2022
Artificial neurons go quantum with photonic circuits
Artificial neurons go quantum with photonic circuits
Quantum memristor as missing link between artificial intelligence and quantum computing In recent years, artificial intelligence has become ubiquitous, with applications such as speech interpretation, image recognition, medical diagnosis, and many more. At the same time, quantum technology has been proven capable of computational power well beyond the reach of even the world's largest supercomputer.

Physics - Materials Science - 20.01.2022
Impossible material made possible inside a graphene sandwich
Impossible material made possible inside a graphene sandwich
Atoms bind together by sharing electrons. The way this happens depends on the atom types but also on conditions such as temperature and pressure. In two-dimensional (2D) materials, such as graphene, atoms join along a plane to form structures just one atom thick, which leads to fascinating properties determined by quantum mechanics.

Physics - Chemistry - 09.12.2021
New State of Matter: Crystalline and Flowing at the Same Time
New State of Matter: Crystalline and Flowing at the Same Time
Through their research efforts, the team was able to finally disprove an intuitive assumption that in order for two particles of matter to merge and form larger units (i.e. aggregates or clusters), they must be attracted to each other. As early as the turn of the century, a team of soft matter physicists headed by Christos Likos of the University of Vienna predicted on the basis of theoretical considerations that this does not necessarily have to be the case.

Physics - 26.11.2021
In quantum mechanics, not even time flows as you might expect it to
In quantum mechanics, not even time flows as you might expect it to
The boundary between forward and backward blurs in quantum mechanics A team of physicists at the Universities of Vienna, Bristol, the Balearic Islands and the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI-Vienna) has shown how quantum systems can simultaneously evolve along two opposite time arrows (forward and backward in time).

Chemistry - Physics - 29.09.2021
Molecular burdocks: peptides guide self-assembly on the micrometre scale
Molecular burdocks: peptides guide self-assembly on the micrometre scale
Chemists demonstrate new approach to self-assembly of colloidal nanoparticles Sometimes even small forces can make comparatively big things happen: In a study in "Angewandte Chemie", scientists from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna showed how short peptides can trigger the self-assembly of comparatively large nanoparticles into new structures on the micrometre scale.

Physics - Computer Science - 02.09.2021
Way to check that quantum computers return accurate answers
Way to check that quantum computers return accurate answers
Quantum computers become ever more powerful, but how can we be sure that the answers they return are accurate? A team of physicists from Vienna, Innsbruck, Oxford, and Singapore solves this problem by letting quantum computers check each other. Quantum computers are advancing at a rapid pace and are already starting to push the limits of the world's largest supercomputers.

Physics - Materials Science - 12.08.2021
Modeling uncovers an 'atomic waltz' for atom manipulation
Modeling uncovers an ’atomic waltz’ for atom manipulation
Researchers at the University of Vienna's Faculty of Physics in collaboration with colleagues from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the USA have uncovered a non-destructive mechanism to manipulate donor impurities within silicon using focused electron irradiation. In this novel indirect exchange process not one but two neighbouring silicon atoms are involved in a coordinated atomic "waltz", which may open a path for the fabrication of solid-state qubits.

Physics - 06.08.2021
Emergent magnetic monopoles controlled at room temperature
Emergent magnetic monopoles controlled at room temperature
Three dimensional (3D) nano-network promise a new era in modern solid state physics with numerous applications in photonics, bio-medicine, and spintronics. The realization of 3D magnetic nano-architectures could enable ultra-fast and low-energy data storage devices. Due to competing magnetic interactions in these systems magnetic charges or magnetic monopoles can emerge, which can be utilized as mobile, binary information carriers.

Physics - 14.07.2021
Heisenberg Under the Microscope
Heisenberg Under the Microscope
The quantum movements of a small glass sphere could be controlled for the first time in Vienna by combining microscopy with control engineering, setting the course for future quantum technologies. A football is not a quantum particle. There are crucial differences between the things we know from everyday life and tiny quantum objects.

Physics - Chemistry - 13.07.2021
Electrons in quantum liquid gain energy from laser pulses
Electrons in quantum liquid gain energy from laser pulses
The absorption of energy from laser light by free electrons in a liquid has been demonstrated for the first time. Until now, this process was observed only in the gas phase. The findings, led by Graz University of Technology, open new doors for ultra-fast electron microscopy. The investigation and development of materials crucially depends on the ability to observe smallest objects at fastest time scales.

Physics - 18.06.2021
Atomic-scale tailoring of graphene approaches macroscopic world
Atomic-scale tailoring of graphene approaches macroscopic world
Properties of materials are often defined by imperfections in their atomic structure, especially when the material itself is just one atom thick, such as graphene. Researchers at the University of Vienna have now developed a method for controlled creation of such imperfections into graphene at length scales approaching the macroscopic world.

Physics - 16.06.2021
Quantum-nonlocality at all speeds
Quantum-nonlocality at all speeds
The phenomenon of quantum nonlocality defies our everyday intuition. It shows the strong correlations between several quantum particles some of which change their state instantaneously when the others are measured, regardless of the distance between them. While this phenomenon has been confirmed for slow moving particles, it has been debated whether nonlocality is preserved when particles move very fast at velocities close to the speed of light, and even more so when those velocities are quantum mechanically indefinite.

Physics - Materials Science - 27.05.2021
It takes some heat to form ice
It takes some heat to form ice
Researchers from TU Graz in Austria and the Universities of Cambridge and Surrey succeeded to track down the first step in ice formation at a surface, revealing that additional energy is needed for water before ice can start to form. Picture material for download at the end of the message Water freezes and turns to ice when brought in contact with a cold surface - a well-known fact.

Physics - Health - 18.05.2021
Crystalline supermirrors for trace gas detection in environmental science and medicine
Crystalline supermirrors for trace gas detection in environmental science and medicine
In an international cooperation with partners from industry and research, physicists from the University of Vienna, together with Thorlabs, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the University of Kansas, have now succeeded for the first time in demonstrating high-performance laser mirrors in the sensing-relevant mid-infrared wavelength range that absorb less than ten out of a million photons.

Physics - 14.05.2021
Is the past (and future) there when nobody looks?
Is the past (and future) there when nobody looks?
Quantum mechanics is famous for its indeterminism, but we can usually use probabilities to quantify our uncertainty about future observations. However, a team of researchers at the University of Vienna, the IQOQI Vienna (Austrian Academy of Sciences) and the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical physics have recently shown that in certain extreme quantum scenarios it is not possible to make such probabilistic predictions, provided that certain key assumptions of quantum mechanics hold true.

Physics - Chemistry - 29.04.2021
How acidic are atoms?
How acidic are atoms?
The acidity of molecules can be easily determined, but until now it was not possible to measure this important property for atoms on a surface. With a new microscopy technique from the Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), this has now been achieved. The degree of acidity or alkalinity of a substance is crucial for its chemical behavior.

Physics - Electroengineering - 26.04.2021
New measurements call spin liquids into question
New measurements call spin liquids into question
Is it possible to transmit information through a material in the form of electron spins? New measurements show: not in the way that scientists had been working on for decades. It is an old dream of solid-state physics: "spin liquids" are a hypothetical state of matter with exotic magnetic properties.

Physics - 12.04.2021
The indestructible light beam
The indestructible light beam
Researchers at Utrecht University and at TU Wien (Vienna) create special light waves that can penetrate even opaque materials as if the material was not even there. Why is sugar not transparent? Because light that penetrates a piece of sugar is scattered, altered and deflected in a highly complicated way.
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