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Materials Science - 06.09.2022
Faster friction - less wear
Faster friction - less wear
A seemingly paradoxical effect: friction normally causes more damage at higher speeds. But at extremely high speeds, it is the other way around. When two metal surfaces slide against each other, a variety of complicated phenomena occur that lead to friction and wear: Small crystalline regions, of which metals are typically composed, can be deformed, twisted or broken, or even fuse together.

Materials Science - 26.08.2022
A Perfect Trap for Light
A Perfect Trap for Light
At TU Wien (Vienna) and The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, a "light trap" was developed in which a beam of light prevents itself from escaping. This allows light to be absorbed perfectly. Whether in photosynthesis or in a photovoltaic system: if you want to use light efficiently, you have to absorb it as completely as possible.

Physics - Materials Science - 24.06.2022
'Hot' graphene reveals migration of carbon atoms
’Hot’ graphene reveals migration of carbon atoms
The migration of carbon atoms on the surface of the nanomaterial graphene was recently measured for the first time. Although the atoms move too swiftly to be directly observed with an electron microscope, their effect on the stability of the material can now be determined indirectly while the material is heated on a microscopic hot plate.

Materials Science - Physics - 16.05.2022
Electronic Skin: Physicist at TU Graz Develops Multisensory Hybrid Material
Electronic Skin: Physicist at TU Graz Develops Multisensory Hybrid Material
The "smart skin" developed by Anna Maria Coclite is very similar to human skin. It senses pressure, humidity and temperature simultaneously and produces electronic signals. More sensitive robots or more intelligent prostheses are thus conceivable. Photographic material for Download at the end of the text The skin is the largest sensory organ and at the same time the protective coat of the human being.

Innovation - Materials Science - 20.04.2022
Graz Universities Present Austria's First Micro-CT Devices for In-Situ Measurements
Graz Universities Present Austria’s First Micro-CT Devices for In-Situ Measurements
The devices can be used to non-destructively observe and measure structural changes inside materials under real operating conditions. They were presented to the public by the inter-university Graz-ÁCT consortium on 20 April. What happens inside a piece of concrete when it comes into contact with acid?

Physics - Materials Science - 20.01.2022
Impossible material made possible inside a graphene sandwich
Impossible material made possible inside a graphene sandwich
Atoms bind together by sharing electrons. The way this happens depends on the atom types but also on conditions such as temperature and pressure. In two-dimensional (2D) materials, such as graphene, atoms join along a plane to form structures just one atom thick, which leads to fascinating properties determined by quantum mechanics.

Materials Science - 28.09.2021
Getting the measure of tricky measurements
Getting the measure of tricky measurements
The new Christian Doppler Laboratory for Measurement Systems for Harsh Operating Conditions at TU Graz is conducting research into suitable measurement techniques that can deliver precise results in tough operating and environmental conditions. Although measurement technology has come a long way, established approaches often come up against their limits in difficult operating and environmental conditions, ultimately delivering inaccurate results or even none at all.

Materials Science - 28.09.2021
Getting the measure of tricky measurements
Getting the measure of tricky measurements
The new Christian Doppler Laboratory for Measurement Systems for Harsh Operating Conditions at TU Graz is conducting research into suitable measurement techniques that can deliver precise results in tough operating and environmental conditions. Although measurement technology has come a long way, established approaches often come up against their limits in difficult operating and environmental conditions, ultimately delivering inaccurate results or even none at all.

Physics - Materials Science - 12.08.2021
Modeling uncovers an 'atomic waltz' for atom manipulation
Modeling uncovers an ’atomic waltz’ for atom manipulation
Researchers at the University of Vienna's Faculty of Physics in collaboration with colleagues from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the USA have uncovered a non-destructive mechanism to manipulate donor impurities within silicon using focused electron irradiation. In this novel indirect exchange process not one but two neighbouring silicon atoms are involved in a coordinated atomic "waltz", which may open a path for the fabrication of solid-state qubits.

Materials Science - Transport - 03.05.2021
Electric Vehicle Batteries: The older they get, the safer they are
Electric Vehicle Batteries: The older they get, the safer they are
Studies at TU Graz show that the older an traction battery of electric vehicles (EV) is, the lower the danger it poses. Now the researchers and industry partners want to define parameters for the subsequent use of discarded batteries. As part of the project "SafeBattery", a team from Graz University of Technology (TU Graz) has been investigating the behaviour of lithium-based batteries in electric cars under crash loads for the past four years.

Physics - Materials Science - 28.03.2021
Electromagnetic Fields of Nanostructures Visualized in 3D for the First Time
Electromagnetic Fields of Nanostructures Visualized in 3D for the First Time
Researchers at TU Graz and the University of Graz, together with experts from France, have succeeded in imaging surface phonons in 3D for the first time. This success could accelerate the development of new, efficient nanotechnologies. Whether for microscopy, data storage or sensor technology, many advanced technological applications that require specific functions rely on the structure of the electromagnetic field near the surfaces of materials.

Physics - Materials Science - 15.03.2021
How do good metals go bad?
How do good metals go bad?
New measurements have solved a mystery in solid state physics: How is it that certain metals do not seem to adhere to the valid rules? We all have a clear picture in mind when we think of metals: We think of solid, unbreakable objects that conduct electricity and exhibit a typical metallic sheen. The behaviour of classical metals, for example their electrical conductivity, can be explained with well-known, well-tested physical theories.

Physics - Materials Science - 22.02.2021
Magnetic effect without a magnet
Magnetic effect without a magnet
Surprise in solid-state physics: The Hall effect, which normally requires magnetic fields, can also be generated in a completely different way - with extreme strength. Electric current is deflected by a magnetic field - in conducting materials this leads to the so-called Hall effect. This effect is often used to measure magnetic fields.

Materials Science - Physics - 08.02.2021
Two-phase material with surprising properties
Two-phase material with surprising properties
Microstructure and macroscopic electro-mechanical properties are closely coupled in so-called ferroelectric polymers. An explanation for the high temperature dependence of this coupling has now been found at TU Wien. In certain materials, electrical and mechanical effects are closely linked: for example, the material may change its shape when an electrical field is applied or, conversely, an electrical field may be created when the material is deformed.

Life Sciences - Materials Science - 01.02.2021
Origami with DNA
Origami with DNA
A team at TU Wien was able to answer important questions about the immune system - with a trick reminiscent of paper folding. T-cells are an important component of our immune system: with the receptors they carry on their surface, they can recognise highly specific antigens. Upon detection of an intruder, an immune response is triggered.

Physics - Materials Science - 14.12.2020
When less is more: a single layer of atoms boosts the nonlinear generation of light
When less is more: a single layer of atoms boosts the nonlinear generation of light
A wide array of technologies, ranging from lasers and optical telecommunication to quantum computing rely on nonlinear optical interaction. Typically, these nonlinear interactions, which allow a beam of light, for example, to change its frequency, are implemented by bulk materials. In a new study an international research team led by the University of Vienna have shown that structures built around a single layer of graphene allow for strong optical nonlinearities that can convert light.

Environment - Materials Science - 09.12.2020
New research project on environmental and safety aspects of stationary energy storage
New research project on environmental and safety aspects of stationary energy storage
The SABATLE project coordinated by TU Graz focuses on the sustainability and safety of redox flow technologies, which are of immanent importance for the stabilization of the power grid. The increasing use of battery technologies in the mobility sector and in stationary applications has been leading to increasing efforts in battery research of operational safety and battery recycling.

Astronomy / Space Science - Materials Science - 27.11.2020
Laboratory experiments could unravel the mystery of the Mars moon Phobos
Laboratory experiments could unravel the mystery of the Mars moon Phobos
What causes the weathering of the Mars moon Phobos? Results from TU Wien give new insights, soon a spacecraft will retrieve soil samples. Of course, there is no weather in our sense of the word in space - nevertheless, soil can also "weather" in the vacuum of space if it is constantly bombarded by high-energy particles, such as those emitted by the sun.

Physics - Materials Science - 23.11.2020
Laser technology: New Trick for Infrared Laser Pulses
Laser technology: New Trick for Infrared Laser Pulses
Infrared light can be used to detect molecules - but it is hard to create strong, short laser pulses. A new solution was found at TU Wien. Ordinary solid-state lasers, as used in laser pointers, generate light in the visible range. For many applications, however, such as the detection of molecules, radiation in the mid-infrared range is needed.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 12.11.2020
TU Graz launches Christian Doppler Laboratory for Solid-State Batteries
TU Graz launches Christian Doppler Laboratory for Solid-State Batteries
The focus of the new CD laboratory is the reduction of interface resistances within the solid-state battery. The aim is to make this particularly safe energy storage system fit for electric vehicles and other high-energy applications. In recent years, intensive research has been carried out on solid-state electrolytes and materials have been developed which have a similarly high ionic conductivity to liquid electrolytes.
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