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Physics - Materials Science - 28.03.2021
Electromagnetic Fields of Nanostructures Visualized in 3D for the First Time
Electromagnetic Fields of Nanostructures Visualized in 3D for the First Time
Researchers at TU Graz and the University of Graz, together with experts from France, have succeeded in imaging surface phonons in 3D for the first time. This success could accelerate the development of new, efficient nanotechnologies. Whether for microscopy, data storage or sensor technology, many advanced technological applications that require specific functions rely on the structure of the electromagnetic field near the surfaces of materials.

Physics - Materials Science - 15.03.2021
How do good metals go bad?
How do good metals go bad?
New measurements have solved a mystery in solid state physics: How is it that certain metals do not seem to adhere to the valid rules? We all have a clear picture in mind when we think of metals: We think of solid, unbreakable objects that conduct electricity and exhibit a typical metallic sheen. The behaviour of classical metals, for example their electrical conductivity, can be explained with well-known, well-tested physical theories.

Physics - Materials Science - 22.02.2021
Magnetic effect without a magnet
Magnetic effect without a magnet
Surprise in solid-state physics: The Hall effect, which normally requires magnetic fields, can also be generated in a completely different way - with extreme strength. Electric current is deflected by a magnetic field - in conducting materials this leads to the so-called Hall effect. This effect is often used to measure magnetic fields.

Materials Science - Physics - 08.02.2021
Two-phase material with surprising properties
Two-phase material with surprising properties
Microstructure and macroscopic electro-mechanical properties are closely coupled in so-called ferroelectric polymers. An explanation for the high temperature dependence of this coupling has now been found at TU Wien. In certain materials, electrical and mechanical effects are closely linked: for example, the material may change its shape when an electrical field is applied or, conversely, an electrical field may be created when the material is deformed.

Life Sciences - Materials Science - 01.02.2021
Origami with DNA
Origami with DNA
A team at TU Wien was able to answer important questions about the immune system - with a trick reminiscent of paper folding. T-cells are an important component of our immune system: with the receptors they carry on their surface, they can recognise highly specific antigens. Upon detection of an intruder, an immune response is triggered.

Physics - Materials Science - 14.12.2020
When less is more: a single layer of atoms boosts the nonlinear generation of light
When less is more: a single layer of atoms boosts the nonlinear generation of light
A wide array of technologies, ranging from lasers and optical telecommunication to quantum computing rely on nonlinear optical interaction. Typically, these nonlinear interactions, which allow a beam of light, for example, to change its frequency, are implemented by bulk materials. In a new study an international research team led by the University of Vienna have shown that structures built around a single layer of graphene allow for strong optical nonlinearities that can convert light.

Environment - Materials Science - 09.12.2020
New research project on environmental and safety aspects of stationary energy storage
New research project on environmental and safety aspects of stationary energy storage
The SABATLE project coordinated by TU Graz focuses on the sustainability and safety of redox flow technologies, which are of immanent importance for the stabilization of the power grid. The increasing use of battery technologies in the mobility sector and in stationary applications has been leading to increasing efforts in battery research of operational safety and battery recycling.

Astronomy / Space Science - Materials Science - 27.11.2020
Laboratory experiments could unravel the mystery of the Mars moon Phobos
Laboratory experiments could unravel the mystery of the Mars moon Phobos
What causes the weathering of the Mars moon Phobos? Results from TU Wien give new insights, soon a spacecraft will retrieve soil samples. Of course, there is no weather in our sense of the word in space - nevertheless, soil can also "weather" in the vacuum of space if it is constantly bombarded by high-energy particles, such as those emitted by the sun.

Physics - Materials Science - 23.11.2020
Laser technology: New Trick for Infrared Laser Pulses
Laser technology: New Trick for Infrared Laser Pulses
Infrared light can be used to detect molecules - but it is hard to create strong, short laser pulses. A new solution was found at TU Wien. Ordinary solid-state lasers, as used in laser pointers, generate light in the visible range. For many applications, however, such as the detection of molecules, radiation in the mid-infrared range is needed.

Environment - Materials Science - 16.11.2020
Sustainable shotcrete mix-designs for tunnels with longer service-life
Sustainable shotcrete mix-designs for tunnels with longer service-life
A project jointly initiated by the Austrian Society for Construction Technology (BV), TU Graz and OTH Regensburg provides a more systematic understanding of shotcrete applications and forms the basis for new, even more durable concrete mixes and thus for more durable tunnels. The service life of tunnels today is designed to last at least for one hundred years - in the case of the Brenner basis tunnel it is even 200 years.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 12.11.2020
TU Graz launches Christian Doppler Laboratory for Solid-State Batteries
TU Graz launches Christian Doppler Laboratory for Solid-State Batteries
The focus of the new CD laboratory is the reduction of interface resistances within the solid-state battery. The aim is to make this particularly safe energy storage system fit for electric vehicles and other high-energy applications. In recent years, intensive research has been carried out on solid-state electrolytes and materials have been developed which have a similarly high ionic conductivity to liquid electrolytes.

Physics - Materials Science - 10.11.2020
Sticky Electrons: When Repulsion turns into Attraction
Sticky Electrons: When Repulsion turns into Attraction
For years, physicists at TU Wien have been studying strange phenomena - now they have found an explanation that could help to understand unconventional types of superconductivity. Materials can assume completely different properties - depending on temperature, pressure, electrical voltage or other physical quantities.

Materials Science - Physics - 07.10.2020
New findings pave the way to environmentally friendly supercapacitors
New findings pave the way to environmentally friendly supercapacitors
Similar to batteries, supercapacitors are suitable for the repeated storage of electrical energy. TU Graz researchers have presented a particularly safe and sustainable variant of such a supercapacitor. Harald Fitzek, Christian Prehal and Qamar Abbas (from left) at the SAXS facility SAXSpoint 2.0 (Anton Paar GmbH): With their work at Graz University of Technology, the researchers are providing new insights into hybrid supercapacitors.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 01.10.2020
Ecological power storage battery made of vanillin
Ecological power storage battery made of vanillin
Researchers at TU Graz have found a way to convert the aromatic substance vanillin into a redox-active electrolyte material for liquid batteries. The technology is an important step towards ecologically sustainable energy storage. TU Graz researcher Stefan Spirk has found a way to replace liquid electrolytes in redox flow batteries by vanillin.

Physics - Materials Science - 31.08.2020
Attention, the electron is too fast!
Attention, the electron is too fast!
Why do different measurements of material properties sometimes give different results? A research team led by the TU Vienna has now found an important answer. It is very hard to take a photo of a hummingbird flapping its wings 50 times per second. The exposure time has to be much shorter than the characteristic time scale of the wing beat, otherwise you will only see a colorful blur.

Life Sciences - Materials Science - 31.08.2020
Autophagy: the beginning of the end
Autophagy: the beginning of the end
Scientists reveal key steps in the formation of the recycling cen-ters of the cell Autophagy, from the Greek for 'self-eating', is an essential process that isolates and recycles cellular components under conditions of stress or when resources are limited. Cargoes such as misfolded proteins or damaged organelles are captured in a double membrane-bound com-partment called the autophagosome and targeted for degradation.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 04.08.2020
Machine learning methods provide new insights into organic-inorganic interfaces
Machine learning methods provide new insights into organic-inorganic interfaces
Simulations at Graz University of Technology refute earlier theories on long-range charge transfer between organic and inorganic materials. Oliver Hofmann and his research group at the Institute of Solid State Physics at TU Graz are working on the optimization of modern electronics. A key role in their research is played by interface properties of hybrid materials consisting of organic and inorganic components, which are used, for example, in OLED displays or organic solar cells.

Physics - Materials Science - 03.08.2020
The Art of Making Tiny Holes
The Art of Making Tiny Holes
How can you perforate an atomic layer of material and leave the one underneath intact? Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) developed a technique for processing surfaces on an atomic scale. Nobody can shoot a pistol bullet through a banana in such a way that the skin is perforated but the banana remains intact.

Materials Science - Electroengineering - 13.07.2020
New Materials for Extra Thin Computer Chips
New Materials for Extra Thin Computer Chips
For a long time, something important has been neglected in electronics: If you want to make electronic components smaller and smaller, you also need the right insulator materials. Ever smaller and ever more compact - this is the direction in which computer chips are developing, driven by industry. This is why so-called 2D materials are considered to be the great hope: they are as thin as a material can possibly be, in extreme cases they consist of only one single layer of atoms.

Physics - Materials Science - 01.07.2020
Magnonic nano-fibers opens the way towards new type of computers
Magnonic nano-fibers opens the way towards new type of computers
Magnetism offers new ways to create more powerful and energy-efficient computers, but the realization of magnetic computing on the nanoscale is a challenging task. A critical advancement in the field of ultralow power computation using magnetic waves is reported by a joint team from Kaiserslautern, Jena and Vienna in the journal Nano Letters.
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