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Results 21 - 40 of 44.


Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space - 22.04.2021
Cat chases mouse in space
Cat chases mouse in space
By Cornelia Kröpfl, BA MA If the groundwater rises sharply, flooding can be imminent. The Tom and Jerry satellites, chasing each other high above the earth, help make important predictions - including about climate change. Between 200 and 300 gigatons of mass is lost from Greenland each year. "A gigaton is an ice cube the size of a cubic kilometre," Torsten Mayer-Gürr makes this - literally - gigantic consequence of climate change strikingly clear.

Earth Sciences - 18.03.2021
TU Graz Researchers Identify Chemical Processes as Key to Understanding Landslides
TU Graz Researchers Identify Chemical Processes as Key to Understanding Landslides
By Christoph Pelzl The study results are based on investigations of repeated mass movements and are expected to benefit planning, maintenance, and development of transportation infrastructure in affected areas. Mass movements such as landslides and hill-slope debris flows cause billions of euros in economic damage around the world every year.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 22.02.2021
Brenner Base Tunnel as a Lighthouse Project: Tunnels to become CO2-neutral energy suppliers
Brenner Base Tunnel as a Lighthouse Project: Tunnels to become CO2-neutral energy suppliers
By Christoph Pelzl Research association led by TU Graz wants to use the heat contained in the discharged tunnel water to supply energy to entire city districts. As part of the FFG programme "City of the Future", a sustainable concept for the city of Innsbruck is being developed. Additional Images for download at the end of the text After completion in about ten years, the Brenner base tunnel is expected to provide relief for transit traffic between Italy and Austria.

Astronomy / Space - Earth Sciences - 19.02.2021
Life of a pure Martian design
Life of a pure Martian design
Experimental microbially assisted chemolithotrophy provides an opportunity to trace the putative bioalteration processes of the Martian crust. A study on the Noachian Martian breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 composed of ancient (ca. Gyr old) crustal materials from Mars, led by ERC grantee Tetyana Milojevic from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna, now delivered a unique prototype of microbial life experimentally designed on a real Martian material.

Earth Sciences - 18.12.2020
Triaxial testing facility: Transition rock under pressure
Triaxial testing facility: Transition rock under pressure
By Birgit Baustädter Neither hard like stone, nor soft like soil: transition rock is important for almost every construction project, but difficult to study. But this is now possible at the TU Graz. Transition rock is soft rock and hard soil; it is inhomogeneous, anisotropic and brittle. "This material can be found almost everywhere where building activities are undertaken.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 20.10.2020
New sediment archive for historical climate research
New sediment archive for historical climate research
By Christoph Pelzl Geological investigations of low-temperature young deposits on the Styrian Erzberg provide paleoclimatology with new data on the earth's history and its development. Additional at the end of the text How has the climate changed in the course of the earth's history? Which climatic processes have influenced the earth and its atmosphere? Paleoclimatology seeks answers to such questions in order to better understand climate changes and to derive forecasts for future climate scenarios.

Earth Sciences - 08.09.2020
Mineral undergoes self-healing of irradiation damage
Mineral undergoes self-healing of irradiation damage
Several minerals suffer radioactive self-irradiation and hence experience long-term changes of their properties. The mineral monazite virtually behaves "just alike Camembert cheese in which holes are drilled": Existing radiation damage heals itself. An international research team led by Lutz Nasdala, Institute of Mineralogy and Crystallography, University of Vienna, conducted an ion-irradiation study that has unravelled the causes of the self-healing of monazite.

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 23.04.2020
Giant teenage shark from the Dinosaur-era
Giant teenage shark from the Dinosaur-era
Fossil vertebrae give insights into growth and extinction of an enigmatic shark group Scientists of the University of Vienna examined parts of a vertebral column, which was found in northern Spain in 1996, and assigned it to the extinct shark group Ptychodontidae. In contrast to teeth, shark vertebrae bear biological information, like body size, growth, and age and allowed the team surrounding Patrick L. Jambura to gain new insights into the biology of this mysterious shark group.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space - 11.09.2019
Seen from orbit, everything's much more precise
Seen from orbit, everything’s much more precise
By Birgit Baustädter Torsten Mayer-Gürr surveys the Earth. He may work in an office in Steyrergasse in Graz, but his measuring device flies more than 400 kilometres overhead. Over 400 kilometres above us in the heavens, Tom and Jerry chased each other for years. One of them always out in front, the other in hot pursuit at a varying distance.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 13.06.2019
Determining the Earth's gravity field more accurately than ever before
Determining the Earth’s gravity field more accurately than ever before
By Christoph Pelzl Researchers at TU Graz calculate the most accurate gravity field determination of the Earth using 1.16 billion satellite measurements. This yields valuable knowledge for climate research. The Earth's gravity fluctuates from place to place. Geodesists use this phenomenon to observe geodynamic and climatological processes.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 07.02.2019
Deep sea reveals linkage between earthquake and carbon cycle
Deep sea reveals linkage between earthquake and carbon cycle
In order to understand the global carbon cycle, deep-sea exploration is essential, an international team led by geologists from Innsbruck concludes. For the first time, they succeeded in quantifying the amount of organic carbon transported into the deep sea by a single tectonic event, the giant Tohoku-oki earthquake in 2011.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 24.10.2018
Climate change: US desert areas to become even drier
Climate change: US desert areas to become even drier
350,000 years of climate history hidden in Devils Hole cave: Geologists from the University of Innsbruck study rainfall patterns in the distant past to better understand how deserts in the southwest United States will be impacted by future climate change. Beneath the Amargosa desert of the southwest United States lies a hidden gem for climate research.

Astronomy / Space - Earth Sciences - 31.08.2018
What's 'up' in space?
What’s ’up’ in space?
The International Astronomical Union has agreed on a new reference frame for directions in space. TU Wien played an important role in developing this new frame. In future, when spacecrafts are sent to other planets or when the rotation of planet Earth is studied, a new reference frame will be used. On 30 August, at the General Meeting of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) in Vienna, the new international celestial reference frame ICRF3 was adopted, allowing for more precise directional specifications in space.

Earth Sciences - 30.01.2018
Giant earthquakes: not as random as thought
Giant earthquakes: not as random as thought
Mud stories provide new insights in the seismic hazard along the Chilean subduction zone By analyzing sediment cores from Chilean lakes, an international team of scientists discovered that giant earthquakes reoccur with relatively regular intervals. When also taking into account smaller earthquakes, the repeat interval becomes increasingly more irregular to a level where earthquakes happen randomly in time.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 24.03.2016
Witnesses to history under geochemical scrutiny
Witnesses to history under geochemical scrutiny
Researchers at TU Graz's Institute of Applied Geosciences reveal findings on climate change, renewable energy and geological processes on the Erzberg mountain by "questioning" special witnesses. How will the climate change in the future? Questions about the future global climate can be better answered when we know more regional details about climate in the past.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 18.08.2014
Human Contribution to Glacier Mass Loss on the Increase
Human Contribution to Glacier Mass Loss on the Increase
By combining climate and glacier models, scientists headed by Ben Marzeion from the University of Innsbruck have found unambiguous evidence for anthropogenic glacier mass loss in recent decades. In a paper published in Science, the researchers report that about one quarter of the global glacier mass loss during the period of 1851 to 2010 is attributable to anthropogenic causes.

Earth Sciences - Chemistry - 18.11.2013
Amber Provides New Insights Into the Earth's Atmosphere
Amber Provides New Insights Into the Earth’s Atmosphere
An international team of researchers led by Ralf Tappert, University of Innsbruck, reconstructed the composition of the Earth's atmosphere of the last 220 million years by analyzing modern and fossil plant resins. The results suggest that atmospheric oxygen was considerably lower in the Earth's geological past than previously assumed.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 18.11.2013
Amber Provides New Insights Into the Evolution of the Earth's Atmosphere
Amber Provides New Insights Into the Evolution of the Earth’s Atmosphere
An international team of researchers led by Ralf Tappert, University of Innsbruck, reconstructed the composition of the Earth's atmosphere of the last 220 million years by analyzing modern and fossil plant resins. The results suggest that atmospheric oxygen was considerably lower in the Earth's geological past than previously assumed.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.07.2013
Global warming will raise sea levels for centuries
Global warming will raise sea levels for centuries
Greenhouse gases emitted today will cause sea level to rise for centuries to come. Each degree of global warming is likely to raise sea level by more than 2 meters in the future, a study now published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows. While thermal expansion of the ocean and melting mountain glaciers are the most important factors causing sea-level change today, the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets will be the dominant contributors within the next two millennia, according to the findings.

Astronomy / Space - Earth Sciences - 16.05.2013
Glaciers Contribute One Third to Sea Level Rise
Glaciers Contribute One Third to Sea Level Rise
Ninety-nine percent of all of Earth's land ice is locked up in the massive Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. However, over the period 2003 to 2009, the melting of the world's other land ice stored in glaciers contributed just as much to sea level rise as the two ice sheets combined. This is the result of a new study led by Alex Gardner from Clark University (USA), which has been published in the current issue of the journal Science.