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Earth Sciences



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Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 31.08.2018
What's 'up' in space?
What’s ’up’ in space?
The International Astronomical Union has agreed on a new reference frame for directions in space. TU Wien played an important role in developing this new frame. In future, when spacecrafts are sent to other planets or when the rotation of planet Earth is studied, a new reference frame will be used. On 30 August, at the General Meeting of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) in Vienna, the new international celestial reference frame ICRF3 was adopted, allowing for more precise directional specifications in space.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 18.08.2014
Human Contribution to Glacier Mass Loss on the Increase
By combining climate and glacier models, scientists headed by Ben Marzeion from the University of Innsbruck have found unambiguous evidence for anthropogenic glacier mass loss in recent decades. In a paper published in Science, the researchers report that about one quarter of the global glacier mass loss during the period of 1851 to 2010 is attributable to anthropogenic causes.

Earth Sciences - Chemistry - 18.11.2013
Amber Provides New Insights Into the Earth's Atmosphere
Amber Provides New Insights Into the Earth’s Atmosphere
An international team of researchers led by Ralf Tappert, University of Innsbruck, reconstructed the composition of the Earth's atmosphere of the last 220 million years by analyzing modern and fossil plant resins. The results suggest that atmospheric oxygen was considerably lower in the Earth's geological past than previously assumed.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.07.2013
Global warming will raise sea levels for centuries
Global warming will raise sea levels for centuries
Greenhouse gases emitted today will cause sea level to rise for centuries to come. Each degree of global warming is likely to raise sea level by more than 2 meters in the future, a study now published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows. While thermal expansion of the ocean and melting mountain glaciers are the most important factors causing sea-level change today, the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets will be the dominant contributors within the next two millennia, according to the findings.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 14.04.2010
Earthquake in Chile causes days to be longer
Since the earthquake in Chile in February 2010, the "Höhere Geodäsie" [Advanced Geodesy] research group at the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics at the Vienna University of Technology (TU Vienna) has been helping measure the earth on a global scale. First results indicate that the rotational speed of the earth has become marginally slower and days have become longer by 0.3 microseconds.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 05.03.2010
The ever-changing Earth
Researchers at the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics at Vienna University of Technology (TU) are investigating the effects of the Earth's atmosphere on our planet's shape, its rotation and its gravitational field. The Earth's atmosphere is not only essential to support human life on Earth; it also affects our planet's shape, its rotation and its gravitational field.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 05.03.2010
The ever-changing Earth
Researchers at the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics at Vienna University of Technology (TU) are investigating the effects of the Earth's atmosphere on our planet's shape, its rotation and its gravitational field. The Earth's atmosphere is not only essential to support human life on Earth; it also affects our planet's shape, its rotation and its gravitational field.

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