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Results 41 - 60 of 228.


Pharmacology - Chemistry - 10.03.2023
Nano shag brushes bring active ingredients into body
Newly developed nanoparticles in the form of tiny shag brushes effectively transport drugs through the body . Once their work is done, they are degraded into natural precursors, releasing active substances that they have brought with them, explained Ian Teasdale of the Institute of Chemistry of Polymers at Johannes Kepler University Linz.

Chemistry - 02.03.2023
Inspired by nature: synthesis of an important molecular ring successful in the laboratory
Inspired by nature: synthesis of an important molecular ring successful in the laboratory
Chemists use new method for sustainable production of cyclopropanes Tripartite ring-shaped hydrocarbons (cyclopropanes) are important structural subunits in many drugs and materials. Their production in the laboratory is challenging and usually involves the generation of various waste products. The research group led by Nuno Maulide, a chemist at the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna, has now developed a new nature-inspired process for the sustainable production of cyclopropanes and presented it in the renowned journal JACS (Journal of the American Chemical Society).

Chemistry - Physics - 27.02.2023
Chaos on the Nanometer Scale
Chaos on the Nanometer Scale
Sometimes, chemical reactions do not solely run stationary in one direction, but they show spatio-temporal oscillations. At TU Wien, a transition to chaotic behavior on the nanometer scale has now been observed. Chaotic behavior is typically known from large systems: for example, from weather, from asteroids in space that are simultaneously attracted by several large celestial bodies, or from swinging pendulums that are coupled together.

Chemistry - 23.02.2023
The inner workings of organic light-emitting diodes
The inner workings of organic light-emitting diodes
How electrons and atomic nuclei make OLEDs glow Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) can be used to generate light from electricity in a cost-effective and sustainable manner. Central to this is the use of efficient dye molecules. A team of theoretical chemists from the University of Vienna has now elucidated how these molecules function by means of computer simulations.

Chemistry - Astronomy / Space - 10.02.2023
On the trail of the origin of life
On the trail of the origin of life
A team of scientists from Austria and France has discovered a new abiotic pathway for the formation of peptide chains from amino acids - an important chemical step in the origin of life. The current study provides strong evidence that this crucial step for the emergence of life can indeed take place even in the very inhospitable conditions of space.

Physics - Chemistry - 25.01.2023
The Last Mysteries of Mica
The Last Mysteries of Mica
A well-known mineral is once again the center of attention thanks to applications in electronics: the Vienna University of Technology shows that mica still has surprises in store. At first glance, mica is something quite ordinary: it is a common mineral, found in granite for example, and has been extensively studied from geological, chemical and technical perspectives.

Physics - Chemistry - 18.01.2023
A new, better technology for X-ray laser pulses
A new, better technology for X-ray laser pulses
Simpler and much more efficient than ever before: A new technology for producing X-ray laser pulses has been developed at TU Wien. The X-rays used to examine a broken leg in hospital are easy to produce. In industry, however, X-ray radiation of a completely different kind is needed - namely, X-ray laser pulses that are as short and high-energy as possible.

Environment - Chemistry - 18.01.2023
Underlying assumptions of air quality need to be redefined
Underlying assumptions of air quality need to be redefined
Long-term measurements in the urban area of Innsbruck, Austria, show that the fraction of ozone near the surface tends to be overestimated in atmospheric models. Consequently, a fundamental assumption for air quality forecasting has to be reinterpreted for urban areas. Measurements by an international team led by atmospheric scientist Thomas Karl of the University of Innsbruck also show that direct nitrogen dioxide emissions are overestimated.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 30.11.2022
Organic cation transporters: study provides insights for the first time
Monoamines are neurotransmitters in the central and peripheral nervous systems and they also transmit signals between cells and the brain. This transmission is followed by their reuptake into the cells by means of transporters. While the specific monoamine transporters have already been well studied, not enough is known about the organic cation transporters, which are high-capacity monoamine transporters.

Physics - Chemistry - 28.11.2022
How to fire projectiles through materials without breaking anything
How to fire projectiles through materials without breaking anything
When charged particles are being shot through ultra-thin layers of material, sometimes spectacular micro-explosions occur, sometimes the material remains almost intact. This has now been explained at the TU Wien. It sounds a bit like a magic trick: Some materials can be shot through with fast, electrically charged ions without exhibiting holes afterwards.

Physics - Chemistry - 08.11.2022
Faster and more Efficient Computer Chips Thanks to Germanium
Faster and more Efficient Computer Chips Thanks to Germanium
TU Wien (Vienna) has succeeded in making a new type of material usable for chip technology. This enables faster, more efficient computers and new types of quantum devices. Our current chip technology is largely based on silicon. Only in very special components a small amount of germanium is added. But there are good reasons to use higher germanium contents in the future: The compound semiconductor silicon-germanium has decisive advantages over today's silicon technology in terms of energy efficiency and achievable clock frequencies.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 27.10.2022
Profiling of sweet-fatty molecules on cell surfaces.
Profiling of sweet-fatty molecules on cell surfaces.
New method enables measurement of glycolipids; now, for example, the relevance in cancer will be investigated So-called glycolipids, or "sweet-fatty" molecules, are a relatively unknown group among the body's diverse lipids. A method developed by an Austrian team led by chemist Evelyn Rampler of the University of Vienna has now provided deeper insights into the functioning of certain glycolipids, which are located, among other things, on the surfaces of stem cells.

Physics - Chemistry - 28.09.2022
Three Eyes See More than Two
Three Eyes See More than Two
Researchers at TU Vienna and FHI Berlin succeeded in monitoring a catalytic reaction with three different microscopies under exactly the same conditions in real time. In this way, information is obtained that none of the methods alone could reveal. One has to look very closely to exactly understand what processes take place on the surfaces of catalysts.

Environment - Chemistry - 31.08.2022
Recycling Greenhouse Gases
Recycling Greenhouse Gases
CO2 and methane can be turned into valuable products. But until now the catalysts required for such reactions quickly lose their effectiveness. TU Wien has now developed more stable alternatives. Wherever the production of harmful greenhouse gases cannot be prevented, they should be converted into something useful: this approach is called "carbon capture and utilisation".

Physics - Chemistry - 30.08.2022
Miniaturized Lab-on-a-Chip for real-time Chemical Analysis of Liquids
Miniaturized Lab-on-a-Chip for real-time Chemical Analysis of Liquids
A fingertip-sized chip replaces bulky laboratory equipment. An infrared sensor has been developed at TU Wien (Vienna) that analyses the content of liquids within the fraction of a second. In analytical chemistry, it is often necessary to accurately monitor the concentration change of certain substances in liquids on a time scale of seconds.

Chemistry - 03.03.2022
Why Some Bubbles Move Faster
Why Some Bubbles Move Faster
By Susanne Filzwieser Why do large gas bubbles in viscoelastic liquids (such as polymer and protein solutions) rise so much faster than expected? An open question with great relevance for industrial production processes. Researchers at TU Graz and TU Darmstadt have now found an explanation. Further at the end of the text It is a puzzle long known among experts and very relevant in many industrial production processes: a jump discontinuity in the rise velocity of gas bubbles in so-called viscoelastic fluids.

Chemistry - Environment - 25.01.2022
Moving towards 80,000 Hours of Fuel Cell Operation and Beyond
Moving towards 80,000 Hours of Fuel Cell Operation and Beyond
By Merit Bodner Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies as viable and sustainable approaches to a renewable energy supply chain are experiencing unprecedented attention. As the industry is growing, its view is becoming increasingly holistic. Novel and innovative ways of maximising product utilisation and minimising product footprint are crucial in establishing a true alternative to conventional solutions.

Physics - Chemistry - 09.12.2021
New State of Matter: Crystalline and Flowing at the Same Time
New State of Matter: Crystalline and Flowing at the Same Time
Through their research efforts, the team was able to finally disprove an intuitive assumption that in order for two particles of matter to merge and form larger units (i.e. aggregates or clusters), they must be attracted to each other. As early as the turn of the century, a team of soft matter physicists headed by Christos Likos of the University of Vienna predicted on the basis of theoretical considerations that this does not necessarily have to be the case.

Chemistry - Innovation - 14.10.2021
Let there be Light: Photoinitiators for Dental Fillings, Contact Lenses and Dentures etc
Let there be Light: Photoinitiators for Dental Fillings, Contact Lenses and Dentures etc
By Susanne Filzwieser Photoinitiators ensure that liquid plastic - for example for dental fillings - hardens quickly by means of light. Thanks to a new synthesis method developed by TU Graz, these initiators can be produced cheaply, something which will open up further doors for the technology. Anyone who has ever been in the dentist's chair with a hole in their tooth is probably familiar with the procedure.

Environment - Chemistry - 12.10.2021
How Can We Counter the Climate Crisis?
How Can We Counter the Climate Crisis?
By Birgit Baustädter The clear answer at TU Graz is by diverse research and green innovations. And this is exactly how the University is working for a more sustainable future. Increasingly extreme weather events, such as torrential rain, hurricanes, droughts and intense snowfalls, clearly show that our world is in the midst of a climate crisis.