news

« BACK

Art and Design



Results 1 - 5 of 5.


Art and Design - Life Sciences - 13.09.2017
When music makes male faces more attractive
When music makes male faces more attractive
Women rate photographs of male faces as more attractive and are more likely to date the men pictured when they have previously heard music. Moreover, highly arousing music led to the largest effect on sexual attraction. A team of psychologists led by Manuela Marin (University of Innsbruck) and Helmut Leder (University of Vienna) explains the significance of this finding in relation to the origins of music in their latest publication in the scientific journal PLOS ONE.

Art and Design - Social Sciences - 30.11.2016
We like what experts like - and what is expensive
We like what experts like - and what is expensive
Whether Peter Paul Rubens or Damien Hirst - the personal taste of art can be argued. Scientists from the Faculty of Psychology of the University of Vienna have now shown that the individual taste of art is also dependent on social factors. The personal valuation of art was influenced by who else liked the work - or not.

Art and Design - Psychology - 12.11.2015
It's music to my eyes
It’s music to my eyes
When people are listening to music, their emotional reactions to the music are reflected in changes in their pupil size. Researchers from the University of Vienna and the University of Innsbruck, Austria, are the first to show that both the emotional content of the music and the listeners' personal involvement with music influence pupil dilation.

Art and Design - Life Sciences - 04.11.2014
Hermit Thrush or Humans - who sets the tone?
Hermit Thrush or Humans - who sets the tone?
The songs of the hermit thrush, a common North American songbird, follow principles found in much human music - namely the harmonic series. Researchers from the University of Vienna, Austria, the Cornish College of the Arts, USA, and the Philipps University of Marburg, Germany, are the first to demonstrate note selection from the harmonic series in a non-human animal using rigorous analytical methods.

Life Sciences - Art and Design - 12.11.2013
Monkeys "understand" rules underlying language musicality
Many of us have mixed feelings when remembering painful lessons in German or Latin grammar in school. Languages feature a large number of complex rules and patterns: using them correctly makes the difference between something which "sounds good", and something which does not. However, cognitive biologists at the University of Vienna have shown that sensitivity to very simple structural and melodic patterns does not require much learning, or even being human: South American squirrel monkeys can do it, too.

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |