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Results 61 - 80 of 110.


Physics - 18.06.2020
Laser technology: The Turbulence and the Comb
Laser technology: The Turbulence and the Comb
A particularly well-ordered kind of laser light can be created by turbulence, which is usually responsible for very disordered phenomena. It is a very special kind of light, which can be used for important measurements: so-called frequency combs play a major role in laser research today. While the light of an ordinary laser only has one single, well-defined wavelength, a frequency comb consists of different light frequencies, which are precisely arranged at regular distances, much like the teeth of a comb.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.06.2020
Cellular stress causes cancer cell chemoresistance
Cellular stress causes cancer cell chemoresistance
Postgenomic technologies reveal new mechanism of stress-induced chemoresistance Resistance of cancer cells against therapeutic agents is a major cause of treatment failure, especially in recurrent diseases. An international team around the biochemists Robert Ahrends from the University of Vienna and Jan Medenbach from the University of Regensburg identified a novel mechanism of chemoresistance which has now been published in "Nature Communications".

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 29.05.2020
Taking a deep look into animals
Taking a deep look into animals
Advances in neuroscience research and microscopy: Researchers look deep into organs and nervous systems of animals, ranging from squids and worms to fish and salamanders. Analyses of individual cells in the context of whole organs or tissues is becoming increasingly important in biology. A standard approach so far was to cut larger tissues into thin layers, study each of these sections, and then piece the information again together into a 3D model.

Life Sciences - Environment - 27.05.2020
The evolutionary puzzle of the mammalian ear
The evolutionary puzzle of the mammalian ear
How could the tiny, tightly connected parts of the ear adapt independently to the amazingly diverse functional and environmental regimes encountered in mammals? A group of researchers from the University of Vienna and the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research proposed a new explanation for this evolutionary puzzle.

Architecture - Social Sciences - 27.05.2020
GAM.16: Designs of uncommon living
GAM.16: Designs of uncommon living
The current issue of the Graz Architecture Magazine (GAM) gathers together new collaborative living concepts under the title "gewohnt: un/common" and presents them for discussion as "rehearsal stages" for affordable living. Rising rents and the constantly growing struggle for living space show that the housing market in Europe, with its stereotypical floor plan typologies, is no longer able to react flexibly to changing requirements and the worsening social situation.

Life Sciences - Electroengineering - 26.05.2020
Novel Electric Impulses Relieve the Pain
Novel Electric Impulses Relieve the Pain
Stimulating the vagus nerve in the ear can help relieving chronic pain. TU Wien and MedUni Vienna have developed novel, sophisticated methods for electric stimulation of the vagus nerve. The vagus nerve plays an important role in our body. It consists of various fibres, some of which connect to the internal organs, but the vagus nerve can also be found in the ear.

Paleontology - Environment - 22.05.2020
First fossil nursery of the great white shark discovered
First fossil nursery of the great white shark discovered
Paleo-kindergarten ensured evolutionary success millions of years ago An international research team led by Jaime A. Villafaña from the Institute of Palaeontology at the University of Vienna discovered the first fossil nursery area of the great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias in Chile. This discovery provides a better understanding of the evolutionary success of the largest top predator in today's oceans in the past and could contribute to the protection of these endangered animals.

Life Sciences - Physics - 20.05.2020
Breaking down stubborn cellulose in time lapse
Breaking down stubborn cellulose in time lapse
Researchers at TU Graz in Austria have for the first time ever succeeded in visualizing at the single-molecule level the processes involved in a biological nanomachine, known as the cellulosome, as it degrades crystalline cellulose. The fundamental insights thus obtained could support sustainable concepts of cellulose utilization to make a breakthrough in industrial biotechnology.

Chemistry - Physics - 19.05.2020
Nature Unveiling Herself Before Science
Nature Unveiling Herself Before Science
Cutting-edge technology allows for real-time monitoring of biomineralisation as an important process of bone formation 21st century societal challenges such as demographic developments and an ageing population demand for new functional materials, such as for bone prostheses. Nature often serves as inspiration when designing these materials.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.05.2020
Technology innovation for neurology: Brain signal measurement using printed tattoo electrodes
Technology innovation for neurology: Brain signal measurement using printed tattoo electrodes
TU Graz researcher Francesco Greco has developed ultra-light tattoo electrodes that are hardly noticeable on the skin and make long-term measurements of brain activity cheaper and easier. Additional at the end of the text In 2015 Francesco Greco, head of the Laboratory of Applied Materials for Printed and Soft electronics (LAMPSe) at the Institute of Solid State Physics at Graz University of Technology, developed so-called "tattoo electrodes" together with Italian scientists.

Physics - Materials Science - 05.05.2020
Less gold is Sometimes Better
Less gold is Sometimes Better
Using an ultra-thin gold layer, scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) succeeded in creating an almost optimal infrared absorber. Possible applications range from astrophysics to virus detection. Infrared detectors play an important role in research: many molecules absorb electromagnetic radiation in the infrared range in a very characteristic way.

Life Sciences - Innovation - 04.05.2020
How to Put Neurons into Cages
How to Put Neurons into Cages
Using microscopically fine 3D printing technologies from TU Wien (Vienna) and sound waves used as tweezers at Stanford University (California), tiny networks of neurons have been created. Microscopically small cages can be produced at TU Wien (Vienna). Their grid openings are only a few micrometers in size, making them ideal for holding cells and allowing living tissue to grow in a very specific shape.

Chemistry - Computer Science - 28.04.2020
Surveying the lipid landscape
Surveying the lipid landscape
Software LipidCreator enables researchers to characterise 60 lipid classes in cells with mass spectrometry Researchers increasingly aim at utilising the manifold functions of lipids in our bodies, e.g. as blood fats or in blood coagulation, to better understand and predict diseases. An international team around Robert Ahrends at the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna now presented a groundbreaking tool for efficient lipid analysis in the journal "Nature Communications".

Physics - Chemistry - 27.04.2020
Superconductivity: It's Hydrogen's Fault
Superconductivity: It’s Hydrogen’s Fault
Nickel is supposed to herald a new age of superconductivity - but this is proving more difficult than expected. Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) can now explain why. Last summer, a new age for high-temperature superconductivity was proclaimed - the nickel age. It was discovered that there are promising superconductors in a special class of materials, the so-called nickelates, which can conduct electric current without any resistance even at high temperatures.

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 23.04.2020
Giant teenage shark from the Dinosaur-era
Giant teenage shark from the Dinosaur-era
Fossil vertebrae give insights into growth and extinction of an enigmatic shark group Scientists of the University of Vienna examined parts of a vertebral column, which was found in northern Spain in 1996, and assigned it to the extinct shark group Ptychodontidae. In contrast to teeth, shark vertebrae bear biological information, like body size, growth, and age and allowed the team surrounding Patrick L. Jambura to gain new insights into the biology of this mysterious shark group.

Chemistry - Environment - 21.04.2020
Water replaces toxins: Green production of plastics
Water replaces toxins: Green production of plastics
Although organic plastics are not harmful to the environment themselves, toxic substances are often used during their synthesis. TU Wien shows - there is another way. Many materials that we use every day are not sustainable. Some are harmful to plants or animals, others contain rare elements that will not always be as readily available as they are today.

Physics - Materials Science - 21.04.2020
Cool down fast to advance quantum nanotechnology
Cool down fast to advance quantum nanotechnology
Rapidly cooling magnon particles proves a surprisingly effective way to create an elusive quantum state of matter, called a Bose-Einstein condensate. The discovery can help advance quantum physics research and is a step towards the long-term goal of quantum computing at room temperature. An international team of scientists have found an easy way to trigger an unusual state of matter called a Bose-Einstein condensate.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.04.2020
Milestone for the early detection of sepsis
Milestone for the early detection of sepsis
Researchers from Graz, Austria, are developing a ground-breaking method that uses biomarkers to detect sepsis 2 to 3 days before the first clinical symptoms appear. This can significantly increase the chances of survival in cases of blood poisoning by bacteria or fungi. Additional at the end of the text Whether activating or silencing genes, breaking down defective cells or building new tissue, our body is constantly working to repair itself, even in cases of illness.

Astronomy / Space Science - 14.04.2020
Beacon in space
Beacon in space
Satellite images from the BRITE mission with the participation of researchers from TU Graz and the Universities of Innsbruck and Vienna document for the first time the complete development of a nova - from eruption to maximum brightness and burn out. The publication has now appeared in the journal Nature Astronomy.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.04.2020
Beacon in space
Beacon in space
BRITE Constellation observes complete nova eruption for the first time Satellite images from the BRITE mission with the participation of researchers* from Graz University of Technology and the Universities of Innsbruck and Vienna document for the first time the complete development of a nova - from eruption to maximum brightness and burn out.