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Physics - Mathematics - 19.12.2017
Hidden bridge between quantum experiments and graph theory uncovered using Melvin
Hidden bridge between quantum experiments and graph theory uncovered using Melvin
An answer to a quantum-physical question provided by the algorithm Melvin has uncovered a hidden link between quantum experiments and the mathematical field of Graph Theory. Researchers from the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the University of Vienna found the deep connection between experimental quantum physics and this mathematical theory in the study of Melvin's unusual solutions, which lies beyond human intuition.

Physics - Electroengineering - 19.12.2017
A particle like slow light
A particle like slow light
A remarkable discovery was made at TU Wien recently, when particles known as 'Weyl fermions' were discovered in materials with strong interaction between electrons. Just like light particles, they have no mass but nonetheless they move extremely slowly. There was great excitement back in 2015, when it was first possible to measure these 'Weyl fermions' - outlandish, massless particles that had been predicted almost 90 years earlier by German mathematician, physician and philosopher, Hermann Weyl.

Physics - Life Sciences - 11.12.2017
Clothes make the woman: less empathy towards women showing more skin
Clothes make the woman: less empathy towards women showing more skin
Sexualized representations, especially the emphasis of secondary sexual characteristics, can change the way we perceive an individual. An international team of researchers led by Giorgia Silani from the Faculty of Psychology at the University of Vienna has shown that empathic feelings and brain responses are reduced when we observe the emotions of sexualized women.

History / Archeology - Physics - 29.11.2017
Prehistoric women had stronger arms than today’s elite rowing teams
The first study to compare ancient and living female bones shows the routine manual labour of women during early agricultural eras was more gruelling than the physical demands of rowing in Cambridge University's famously competitive boat clubs. Researchers von der University of Cambridge und der Anthropologe Ron Pinhasi von der Universität Wien say the findings suggest a "hidden history" of women's work stretching across millennia.

Physics - Chemistry - 24.10.2017
Jumping Nanoparticles
Jumping Nanoparticles
Transitions occurring in nanoscale systems, such as a chemical reaction or the folding of a protein, are strongly affected by friction and thermal noise. Almost 80 years ago, the Dutch physicist Hendrik Kramers predicted that such transitions occur most frequently at intermediate friction, an effect known as Kramers turnover.

Chemistry - Physics - 26.09.2017
Artificial intelligence for obtaining chemical fingerprints
Artificial intelligence for obtaining chemical fingerprints
Researchers at the Universities of Vienna and Göttingen have succeeded in developing a method for predicting molecular infrared spectra based on artificial intelligence. These chemical "fingerprints" could only be simulated by common prediction techniques for small molecules in high quality. With the help of the new technology, which is based on neuronal networks similar to the human brain and is therefore capable of learning, the team led by Philipp Marquetand from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna was able to carry out simulations that were previously not possible.

Physics - Chemistry - 25.09.2017
Searching for the best 3D-printing materials
Searching for the best 3D-printing materials
TU Wien is conducting research into high-precision 3D printing technology. Now, a new method is enabling researchers to look for suitable materials with greater precision than ever. How is it possible to build a model of St Stephen‘s Cathedral the size of a dust particle' Well, using TU Wien's modern 3D-printing technology, this is no longer a problem.

Physics - Mathematics - 13.09.2017
The Beam of Invisibility
The Beam of Invisibility
A new cloaking technology has been developed at TU Wien: a special kind of material is irradiated from above in such a way that another beam of light can pass completely uninhibited. The material is irradiated with a specially designed pattern, the wave from the left can pass through the object completely unperturbed.

Physics - Chemistry - 11.09.2017
Hollow Atoms: The Consequences of an Underestimated Effect
Hollow Atoms: The Consequences of an Underestimated Effect
A riddle, which has been bugging atomic physicists for more than 20 years, has been solved. The solution should help to understand the helpful effects of ionizing radiation in cancer therapy. A highly charged ion (center) passing through graphene can transfer energy to several carbon atoms simultaneously.

Physics - 23.08.2017
New ERC grant - using mercury to explain the universe
New ERC grant - using mercury to explain the universe
Simon Stellmer has been awarded a prestigious ERC Starting Grant. He will now use ultracold mercury atoms to investigate fundamental symmetries in nature. Why is there matter in the universe at all? To date there has been no conclusive answer to this question. Our understanding of the Big Bang is based on the assumption that equal amounts of antimatter and matter were created.

Physics - Chemistry - 23.08.2017
New ERC grant - using mercury to explain the universe
New ERC grant - using mercury to explain the universe
Simon Stellmer has been awarded a prestigious ERC Starting Grant. He will now use ultracold mercury atoms to investigate fundamental symmetries in nature. Why is there matter in the universe at all? To date there has been no conclusive answer to this question. Our understanding of the Big Bang is based on the assumption that equal amounts of antimatter and matter were created.

Physics - Chemistry - 22.08.2017
Quantum Ruler for Biomolecules
Quantum Ruler for Biomolecules
Quantum physics teaches us that unobserved particles may propagate through space like waves. This is philosophically intriguing and of technological relevance: a research team at the University of Vienna has demonstrated that combining experimental quantum interferometry with quantum chemistry allows deriving information about optical and electronic properties of biomolecules, here exemplified with a set of vitamins.

Physics - Chemistry - 11.08.2017
Massive particles test standard quantum theory
Massive particles test standard quantum theory
In quantum mechanics particles can behave as waves and take many paths through an experiment, even when a classical marble could only take one of them at any time. However, it requires only combinations of pairs of paths, rather than three or more, to determine the probability for a particle to arrive somewhere.

Physics - 27.07.2017
It's never too cold for quantum
It’s never too cold for quantum
The peculiar characteristics demonstrated by 'quantum critical points' at absolute zero remain one of the great unsolved mysteries of science. Normally, there needs to be a change in temperature in order to see a phase transition: a liquid gets cold, it freezes; a metal heats up, it loses its magnetic properties.

Physics - Electroengineering - 25.07.2017
Magnetic Quantum Objects in a
Magnetic Quantum Objects in a "Nano Egg-Box"
Magnetic quantum objects in superconductors, so-called "fluxons", are particularly suitable for the storage and processing of data bits. Computer circuits based on fluxons could be operated with significantly higher speed and, at the same time, produce much less heat dissipation. Physicists around Wolfgang Lang at the University of Vienna and their colleagues at the Johannes-Kepler-University Linz have now succeeded in producing a "quantum egg-box" with a novel and simple method.

Physics - Chemistry - 13.07.2017
Marine microplastics: many past studies contaminated
Marine microplastics: many past studies contaminated
Wherever you look, you are almost guaranteed to find tiny plastic particles. However, a study conducted by TU Wien has revealed that, in many cases, what is thought to be plastic found in samples of seawater may actually be natural fibres from lab coats. Plastic is constantly finding its way into the ocean - it comes from ships, unsecured landfill sites and the sewage system.

Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 12.07.2017
Nickel is Crucial for the Earth's Magnetic Field
Nickel is Crucial for the Earth’s Magnetic Field
Scientists at TU Wien and Würzburg University are changing our idea of the earth's magnetic field: iron alone cannot explain the concept of the geodynamo. The crucial ingredient is nickel. It only takes a simple compass to demonstrate that the earth has a magnetic field - but it is quite difficult to explain how exactly it is created.

Physics - Chemistry - 09.06.2017
Graphene encapsulation provides unprecedented view of the diffusion and rotation of fullerene molecules
Graphene encapsulation provides unprecedented view of the diffusion and rotation of fullerene molecules
Scientists at the University of Vienna have created a new hybrid structure, termed buckyball sandwich, by encapsulating a single layer of fullerene molecules between two graphene sheets. Buckyball sandwiches combine for the first time soccerball-like fullerenes, each consisting of sixty carbon atoms, and graphene, a one-atom thick layer of carbon.

Physics - Electroengineering - 23.05.2017
Measured for the first time: direction of light waves changed by quantum effect
Measured for the first time: direction of light waves changed by quantum effect
The 'quantized magneto-electric effect' has been demonstrated for the first time in topological insulators at TU Wien, which is set to open up new and highly accurate methods of measurement. A light wave sent through empty space always oscillates in the same direction. However, certain materials can be used to rotate the direction in which the light is oscillating when placed in a magnetic field.

Physics - 17.05.2017
Testing Quantum Field Theory in a Quantum Simulator
Testing Quantum Field Theory in a Quantum Simulator
A new way to characterize many-particle quantum systems has been presented in the journal "Nature" by TU Wien (Vienna) and Heidelberg University. Quantum simulators can now be used to take a deeper look at previously unanswered questions. What happened right after the beginning of the universe? How can we understand the structure of quantum materials' How does the Higgs-Mechanism work? Such fundamental questions can only be answered using quantum field theories.

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