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Physics - Chemistry - 24.10.2017
Jumping Nanoparticles
Jumping Nanoparticles
Transitions occurring in nanoscale systems, such as a chemical reaction or the folding of a protein, are strongly affected by friction and thermal noise. Almost 80 years ago, the Dutch physicist Hendrik Kramers predicted that such transitions occur most frequently at intermediate friction, an effect known as Kramers turnover.

Chemistry - Physics - 26.09.2017
Artificial intelligence for obtaining chemical fingerprints
Artificial intelligence for obtaining chemical fingerprints
Researchers at the Universities of Vienna and Göttingen have succeeded in developing a method for predicting molecular infrared spectra based on artificial intelligence. These chemical "fingerprints" could only be simulated by common prediction techniques for small molecules in high quality. With the help of the new technology, which is based on neuronal networks similar to the human brain and is therefore capable of learning, the team led by Philipp Marquetand from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna was able to carry out simulations that were previously not possible.

Physics - Chemistry - 25.09.2017
Searching for the best 3D-printing materials
Searching for the best 3D-printing materials
TU Wien is conducting research into high-precision 3D printing technology. Now, a new method is enabling researchers to look for suitable materials with greater precision than ever. How is it possible to build a model of St Stephen‘s Cathedral the size of a dust particle' Well, using TU Wien's modern 3D-printing technology, this is no longer a problem.

Physics - Chemistry - 11.09.2017
Hollow Atoms: The Consequences of an Underestimated Effect
Hollow Atoms: The Consequences of an Underestimated Effect
A riddle, which has been bugging atomic physicists for more than 20 years, has been solved. The solution should help to understand the helpful effects of ionizing radiation in cancer therapy. A highly charged ion (center) passing through graphene can transfer energy to several carbon atoms simultaneously.

Physics - Chemistry - 23.08.2017
New ERC grant - using mercury to explain the universe
New ERC grant - using mercury to explain the universe
Simon Stellmer has been awarded a prestigious ERC Starting Grant. He will now use ultracold mercury atoms to investigate fundamental symmetries in nature. Why is there matter in the universe at all? To date there has been no conclusive answer to this question. Our understanding of the Big Bang is based on the assumption that equal amounts of antimatter and matter were created.

Physics - Chemistry - 22.08.2017
Quantum Ruler for Biomolecules
Quantum Ruler for Biomolecules
Quantum physics teaches us that unobserved particles may propagate through space like waves. This is philosophically intriguing and of technological relevance: a research team at the University of Vienna has demonstrated that combining experimental quantum interferometry with quantum chemistry allows deriving information about optical and electronic properties of biomolecules, here exemplified with a set of vitamins.

Physics - Chemistry - 11.08.2017
Massive particles test standard quantum theory
Massive particles test standard quantum theory
In quantum mechanics particles can behave as waves and take many paths through an experiment, even when a classical marble could only take one of them at any time. However, it requires only combinations of pairs of paths, rather than three or more, to determine the probability for a particle to arrive somewhere.

Physics - Chemistry - 13.07.2017
Marine microplastics: many past studies contaminated
Marine microplastics: many past studies contaminated
Wherever you look, you are almost guaranteed to find tiny plastic particles. However, a study conducted by TU Wien has revealed that, in many cases, what is thought to be plastic found in samples of seawater may actually be natural fibres from lab coats. Plastic is constantly finding its way into the ocean - it comes from ships, unsecured landfill sites and the sewage system.

Environment - Chemistry - 21.06.2017
CO2-neutral hydrogen from biomass
CO2-neutral hydrogen from biomass
Without fossil fuels, there can be no blast furnace process - but hydrogen could play a more important role in the future. An environmentally friendly process is being developed at TU Wien by which biomass can be used to produce a hydrogen-rich gas that can then be employed in various ways in the iron and steel industry.

Physics - Chemistry - 09.06.2017
Graphene encapsulation provides unprecedented view of the diffusion and rotation of fullerene molecules
Graphene encapsulation provides unprecedented view of the diffusion and rotation of fullerene molecules
Scientists at the University of Vienna have created a new hybrid structure, termed buckyball sandwich, by encapsulating a single layer of fullerene molecules between two graphene sheets. Buckyball sandwiches combine for the first time soccerball-like fullerenes, each consisting of sixty carbon atoms, and graphene, a one-atom thick layer of carbon.

Physics - Chemistry - 08.05.2017
Chemically tailored Graphene
Chemically tailored Graphene
Graphene is considered as one of the most promising new materials. However, the systematic insertion of chemically bound atoms and molecules to control its properties is still a major challenge. Now, for the first time, scientists of the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, the University of Vienna, the Freie Universität Berlin and the University Yachay Tech in Ecuador succeeded in precisely verifying the spectral fingerprint of such compounds in both theory and experiment.

Innovation / Technology - Chemistry - 18.04.2017
Hand scanner measures bitumen quality
Hand scanner measures bitumen quality
Asphalt does not last forever. At some point, it ages and starts to crumble. This has to do with the bitumen, the sticky binding agent, which holds and keeps the rock content in the asphalt. Bitumen is a petroleum product consisting of several organic components, which undergo a chemical change over time.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 28.03.2017
How does Oxygen get into a Fuel Cell?
How does Oxygen get into a Fuel Cell?
In order for a fuel cell to work, it needs an oxidising agent. TU Wien has now found a way to explain why oxygen does not always enter fuel cells effectively, rendering them unusable. Fuel cells use a simple chemical reaction, such as the combination of oxygen and hydrogen to form water, to generate electricity.

Physics - Chemistry - 13.03.2017
Using molecules to detune nanodrums
Using molecules to detune nanodrums
The analysis of the minutest quantities of pharmaceutical samples is of crucial importance for the research and synthesis of new medications. At the moment it represents a technical challenge, but a new infrared method of measurement developed by TU Wien in collaboration with two research groups from Copenhagen may remedy this.

Chemistry - 30.01.2017
Fluorescence Dyes from the Pressure Cooker
Fluorescence Dyes from the Pressure Cooker
Dye synthesis in nothing but water instead of toxic solvents - researchers at TU Wien develop a highly efficient and environmentally friendly synthesis for organic pigments. Fabian Zechmeister (left) and Maximilian Raab (right) demonstrate the fluorescence of a perylene bisimide solution Inside front cover of the current issue of Chemical Communications.

Chemistry - 30.01.2017
Fluorescence Dyes from the Pressure Cooker
Fluorescence Dyes from the Pressure Cooker
Dye synthesis in nothing but water instead of toxic solvents - researchers at TU Wien develop a highly efficient and environmentally friendly synthesis for organic pigments. Fabian Zechmeister (left) and Maximilian Raab (right) demonstrate the fluorescence of a perylene bisimide solution Inside front cover of the current issue of Chemical Communications.

Physics - Chemistry - 26.01.2017
Chiral Quantum Optics: A New Research Field with Bright Perspectives
Chiral Quantum Optics: A New Research Field with Bright Perspectives
Surprising direction-dependent effects emerge when light is guided in microscopic structures. This discovery shows promise for both classical and quantum information processing Recently, surprising physical effects were observed using special microscopic waveguides for light. Such "photonic structures" currently are revolutionizing the fields of optics and photonics, and have opened up the new research area of "Chiral Quantum Optics".

Physics - Chemistry - 10.01.2017
"Weak Measurement" with strong results
Nuclear spin tomography is an application in (human) medicine known from medical institutions. The patient absorbs and re-emits electromagnetic radiation in all directions in space. They are detected and 3D images or 2D slice images are reconstructed from that data. Set in the framework of a fundamental science laboratory, the patient is replaced by a quantum object and the electromagnetic radiation by quantum measurement.

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