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Life Sciences - Health - 12.04.2022
Largest study of its kind links specific genes to schizophrenia
In the largest study so far conducted into schizophrenia, which included more than 320,000 participants, scientists from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC), a group of several hundred researchers from 45 countries, identified a large number of genes that may play a significant role in the disorder.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.04.2022
Relieving symptoms in paraplegia
Up to 80% of people with a spinal cord injury suffer from spasticity. Until now, they had to choose between drugs with severe side effects or risky surgery. Mathematician and neuroscientist Ursula Hofstötter from the Medical University of Vienna developed a procedure that alleviates spasticity and also improves mobility - without any drugs or surgery.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.04.2022
Nerve Stimulation with the Help of Implantable Mini Solar Cells
Nerve Stimulation with the Help of Implantable Mini Solar Cells
By Christoph Pelzl An international research team has successfully developed and tested a concept in which nerves are stimulated with light pulses. The method provides considerable advantages for medicine and opens up a wide range of possible applications.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 23.02.2022
Ancient DNA reveals surprises about how early Africans lived, traveled and interacted
Ancient DNA reveals surprises about how early Africans lived, traveled and interacted
New research provides evidence of demographic shifts in sub-Saharan Africa A new analysis of human remains that were buried in African archaeological sites has produced the earliest DNA from the continent, telling a fascinating tale of how early humans lived, traveled and even found their significant others.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.02.2022
Investigating the waste in our cells: So that we can soon forget about Alzheimer's
Investigating the waste in our cells: So that we can soon forget about Alzheimer’s
Autophagy: What to do with the waste in our cells? A 'waste collection' tidies up our cells. If something does not go according to plan, serious diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's may develop. Molecular biologist Sascha Martens from the University of Vienna together with international partners - researchers of the University of Pennsylvania, Monash University, the Max Planck Institute of Biophysics in Frankfurt and the UC Berkeley - investigate the associated process: autophagy.

Life Sciences - 03.02.2022
Animal genomes: Chromosomes almost unchanged for over 600 million years
Animal genomes: Chromosomes almost unchanged for over 600 million years
Diversity of species arises through chromosomal mixing By comparing chromosomes of different animal groups scientists at the University of Vienna led by Oleg Simakov and at the University of California made an astonishing discovery: Every animal species has almost the same chromosomal units that appear over and over again - and this has been the case since the first animals emerged about 600 million years ago.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.01.2022
Computational Models of Neurons and Astrocytes in Studying Brain Dynamics in Health and Disease
Computational Models of Neurons and Astrocytes in Studying Brain Dynamics in Health and Disease
By Kerstin Lenk Astrocytes are non-neuronal brain cells that contribute to the exchange of neurotransmitters and ions. They are involved in various cognitive functions like sleep and memory formation. Using computational models, we simulate the interaction between neurons and astrocytes. By perturbing parts of the signaling pathways, we investigate astrocyte behavior in diseases like Alzheimer's, epilepsy, and schizophrenia.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 10.01.2022
Within a dinosaur's head: ankylosaur was sluggish and deaf
Within a dinosaur’s head: ankylosaur was sluggish and deaf
German and Austrian scientists took a closer look at the braincase of a dinosaur from Austria. The group examined the fossil with a micro-CT and found surprising new details: it was sluggish and deaf. The respective study got recently published in the scientific journal scientific reports. Ankylosaurs could grow up to eight meters in body length and represent a group of herbivorous dinosaurs, also called 'living fortresses': Their body was cluttered with bony plates and spikes.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 22.12.2021
World's oldest family tree provides new insights into kinship and burial practices in Neolithic times
World’s oldest family tree provides new insights into kinship and burial practices in Neolithic times
By analyzing ancient DNA an international team of scientists with participation of Ron Pinhasi's team of the University of Vienna was able to retrace the world's oldest family tree. They took samples from a Neolithic tomb in Britain. In their study published they reveal undiscovered information about the structure of prehistoric families.

Life Sciences - Environment - 26.11.2021
The Study of the Microbiome Enables New Strategies for Healthy and Climate-Resilient Crops
The Study of the Microbiome Enables New Strategies for Healthy and Climate-Resilient Crops
By Christoph Pelzl Study led by TU Graz shows that apple trees inherit their microbiome to the same extent as their genes. The results lay the foundation for new breeding strategies for healthy and climate-robust fruit and vegetables. Agriculture is facing enormous challenges worldwide due to global changes caused by human activities.

Life Sciences - 05.11.2021
How to decode the meaning of melodies in animal vocalizations
How to decode the meaning of melodies in animal vocalizations
Evolution led to similarities in the melodies of animal vocalizations and human languages When listening closely, the melodies of human languages and animal vocalizations are very similar. However, it is not yet fully resolved if similar patterns in languages and animal vocalizations also have similar meanings.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.11.2021
Profound ecological change in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea
Profound ecological change in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea
Distinct ecological niches: Tropical species profoundly alter ecosystem functioning in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea - with unknown consequences. Assemblages of tropical non-indigenous species in the Eastern Mediterranean have biological traits that markedly differ from those of native biological communities.

Life Sciences - 29.10.2021
Why do humans possess a twisted birth canal?
Why do humans possess a twisted birth canal?
Extraordinary shape makes births more difficult, but guarantees stability The relatively narrow human birth canal presumably evolved as a "compromise" between its abilities for parturition, support of the inner organs, and upright walking. But not only the size of the birth canal, also its complex, "twisted" shape is an evolutionary puzzle.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.10.2021
Fighting viruses with interchangeable defense genes
Fighting viruses with interchangeable defense genes
Bacteria rapidly modify mobile parts of their genome to develop resistance to viruses Bacterial viruses, so-called phages, destroy bacteria. Bacteria are constantly exposed to viral attacks. A research team led by Martin Polz, a microbiologist at the University of Vienna, has now studied how bacteria defend themselves against viral predators.

Life Sciences - Environment - 01.10.2021
Making Bacteria Eat Exhaust Fumes
Making Bacteria Eat Exhaust Fumes
By Beate Mosing The grey clouds of exhaust from industry are not only not a pretty sight, they are partially responsible for climate change, the effects of which we are now clearly experiencing. But it could also work differently. Turning waste streams, or more precisely, CO2, into a raw material is Regina Kratzer's declared goal.

Life Sciences - 27.09.2021
BCI Research: Computer Decodes Continuous Movement from Brain Signals
BCI Research: Computer Decodes Continuous Movement from Brain Signals
By Christoph Pelzl For the first time ever, the intention of a continuous movement was able to be read out from non-invasive brain signals at TU Graz. This success enables more natural and non-invasive control of neuroprostheses to be carried out in real time. Intended to give paraplegic people back some freedom of movement and thus a better quality of life, so-called brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) measure the person's brain activity and convert the electrical currents into control signals for neuroprostheses.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.09.2021
Research at the interface between medicine and technology
Research at the interface between medicine and technology
By Birgit Baustädter Graz was instrumental in the birth of biomedical engineering in Austria 50 years ago - a step that laid the foundations for a long record of research successes. Today, numerous institutes work at the intersection between medicine and technology. "Optional subgroup IV Healthcare information".

Life Sciences - Health - 03.09.2021
Gut bacteria influence brain development
Gut bacteria influence brain development
Researchers discover biomarkers that indicate early brain injury in extreme premature infants Extremely premature infants are at a high risk for brain damage. Researchers at the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna have now found possible targets for the early treatment of such damage outside the brain: Bacteria in the gut of premature infants may play a key role.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.07.2021
Root exudation and biological nitrification potential in pearl millet can boost sustainable agriculture
Root exudation and biological nitrification potential in pearl millet can boost sustainable agriculture
Agriculture is the main source for the majority of the input of reactive N to terrestrial systems; large amounts of fertilizer N are lost from the root zone as nitrate through leaching and denitrification. Avoiding the combination of high external inputs with low resource use efficiency remains a major concern for the sustainability of N in agroecosystems.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.07.2021
Symbionts sans frontieres: Bacterial partners travel the world
Symbionts sans frontieres: Bacterial partners travel the world
This pandemic year has seen us confined to our homes and restricted from travelling the world. Not so for some microscopic bacteria in the ocean: Throughout the globe, they partner up with clams from the family Lucinidae, which live unseen in the sand beneath the shimmering blue waters of coastal habitats.
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