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Results 1 - 17 of 17.


History / Archeology - 03.05.2024
First mother-daughter burial from the Roman period found in Austria
First mother-daughter burial from the Roman period found in Austria
Ancient grave find in Wels provides new insights through interdisciplinary research. When a grave was discovered in Wels 20 years ago, the find was thought to be the early medieval double burial of a married couple together with a horse due to its unusual characteristics. Only now has it been possible to clarify the biological sex and relationship of the buried persons using the latest archaeological technologies.

Computer Science - History / Archeology - 25.04.2024
Early Christian Altar Stone: Swarm Intelligence to Help with Reconstruction
Early Christian Altar Stone: Swarm Intelligence to Help with Reconstruction
Researchers from TU Graz and the University of Graz have digitised a broken altar stone from Lavant so that citizens can put it together on the internet. The aim is to achieve what generations of archaeologists have failed to do. The Bishop's church at Kirchbichl in Lavant in East Tyrol is one of the most important early Christian monuments in Austria.

Health - History / Archeology - 29.03.2024
Crimean-Congo Fever: molecular mechanism of infection discovered
The Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever virus (CCHFV), first described in 1944, is also spreading rapidly in Europe due to global warming and is included in the WHO list of infectious agents with epidemic or pandemic potential as a top priority. There are currently no therapeutic or preventative measures available against the disease, which is mainly transmitted by ticks and is fatal in 40 per cent of cases.

History / Archeology - 09.10.2023
5,000-year-old wine for Egyptian queen
5,000-year-old wine for Egyptian queen
New archaeological discoveries at the tomb of Meret-Neith in Abydos A German-Austrian team led by archaeologist Christiana Köhler from the University of Vienna is investigating the tomb of Queen Meret-Neith in Abydos, Egypt.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 25.08.2023
Hallstatt: 3,000-year-old intestinal parasites of miners analysed
Hallstatt: 3,000-year-old intestinal parasites of miners analysed
Researchers in Vienna have obtained the world's first gene sequences of the human roundworm from the Bronze Age, as well as the first gene sequences from prehistoric parasites in Austria. The analysis was conducted on human faeces from prehistoric miners in Hallstatt. The findings were published by a team from the Medical University Vienna, the Austrian Academy of Sciences (OeAW) and the Natural History Museum Vienna in the journal Nature Scientific Reports.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 16.05.2023
Jaw shapes of 90 shark species show: Evolution driven by habitat
Jaw shapes of 90 shark species show: Evolution driven by habitat
Analysis using X-ray computed tomography and 3D reconstructions An international research team led by Faviel A. López-Romero of the University of Vienna investigated how the jaw shape of sharks has changed over the course of evolution.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 12.01.2023
Alps: New findings about earthquake history
Alps: New findings about earthquake history
A team of geologists from the University of Innsbruck examined the sediments of Carinthian lakes for traces of past earthquakes. The results show that the earthquake of 1348 caused the strongest shaking in the Carinthian region since the end of the last cold period. Earthquakes with potential building damage are rare there, but can occur in temporal clusters .

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 02.06.2022
Archaeological Science as Game-Changer: What ancient genes tell us about who we are
Archaeological Science as Game-Changer: What ancient genes tell us about who we are
Research at the University of Vienna could solve mystery of human evolution Using the latest scientific methods, Tom Higham and Katerina Douka from the University of Vienna want to solve a great mystery of human evolution: Why are we the only humans left? Higham and Douka were the first ones to find a first-generation offspring of two different types of human.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 28.02.2022
Mystery solved about the origin of the 30,000-year-old Venus of Willendorf
Mystery solved about the origin of the 30,000-year-old Venus of Willendorf
New research method shows that the material likely comes from northern Italy The almost 11 cm high figurine from Willendorf is one of the most important examples of early art in Europe. It is made of a rock called "oolite" which is not found in or around Willendorf.

History / Archeology - 13.04.2021
Childbirth versus pelvic floor stability: An evolutionary history of compromises
Childbirth versus pelvic floor stability: An evolutionary history of compromises
Human childbirth is comparatively difficult because our babies' heads are large relative to our birth canals. This tight "fetopelvic" fit increases the risk of obstructed labor, which in turn has potentially dire outcomes for both mother and child. It has long been thought that bipedalism prevents further widening of the human pelvis.

History / Archeology - 24.03.2021
Older than expected: Teeth reveal the origin of the tiger shark
Older than expected: Teeth reveal the origin of the tiger shark
With a total length of up to 5.5m, the tiger shark is one of the largest predatory sharks known today. This shark is a cosmopolitan species occurring in all oceans worldwide. It is characterized by a striped pattern on its back, which is well marked in juveniles but usually fades in adults.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 23.12.2020
Ancient DNA shines light on Caribbean prehistory
Ancient DNA shines light on Caribbean prehistory
An international team of scientists reveals the genetic makeup of the people who lived in the Caribbean between about 400 and 3,100 years ago-at once settling several archaeologic and anthropologic debates, illuminating present-day ancestries and reaching startling conclusions about Indigenous population sizes when Caribbean cultures were devastated by European colonialism beginning in the 1490s.

Environment - History / Archeology - 23.07.2020
Flood data from 500 years: Rivers and climate change in Europe
Flood data from 500 years: Rivers and climate change in Europe
A major international research project led by TU Wien (Vienna) shows for the first time that flooding characteristics in recent decades are unlike those of previous centuries Overflowing rivers can cause enormous problems: Worldwide, the annual damage caused by river floods is estimated at over 100 billion dollars - and it continues to rise.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 07.11.2019
Ancient Rome: a 12,000-year history of genetic flux, migrations and diversity
Ancient Rome: a 12,000-year history of genetic flux, migrations and diversity
Scholars have been all over Rome for hundreds of years, but it still holds some secrets - for instance, relatively little is known about where the city's denizens actually came from. Now, an international team led by Researchers from the University of Vienna, Stanford University and Sapienza University of Rome, is filling in the gaps with a genetic history that shows just how much the Eternal City's populace mirrored its sometimes tumultuous history.

History / Archeology - Physics - 29.11.2017
Prehistoric women had stronger arms than today’s elite rowing teams
The first study to compare ancient and living female bones shows the routine manual labour of women during early agricultural eras was more gruelling than the physical demands of rowing in Cambridge University's famously competitive boat clubs. Researchers von der University of Cambridge und der Anthropologe Ron Pinhasi von der Universität Wien say the findings suggest a "hidden history" of women's work stretching across millennia.

Computer Science - History / Archeology - 30.05.2016
From mobile phone photo to virtual reality
From mobile phone photo to virtual reality
Completely ordinary photos are being transformed into clean, high-resolution 3D worlds thanks to algorithms from TU Wien.

Physics - History / Archeology - 10.03.2016
The
The "great smoky dragon" of Quantum Physics
Physicists around Anton Zeilinger have, for the first time, evaluated the almost 100-year long history of quantum delayed-choice experiments - from the theoretical beginnings with Albert Einstein to the latest research works in the present. The extensive study now appeared in the renowned journal "Reviews of Modern Physics".