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Results 61 - 80 of 95.


Earth Sciences - 18.03.2021
TU Graz Researchers Identify Chemical Processes as Key to Understanding Landslides
TU Graz Researchers Identify Chemical Processes as Key to Understanding Landslides
The study results are based on investigations of repeated mass movements and are expected to benefit planning, maintenance, and development of transportation infrastructure in affected areas. Mass movements such as landslides and hill-slope debris flows cause billions of euros in economic damage around the world every year.

Health - Psychology - 15.03.2021
Fear of COVID-19 : Psychological, not environmental factors are important
Fear of COVID-19 : Psychological, not environmental factors are important
During pandemics, protective behaviors need to be motivated by effective communication. A critical factor in understanding a population's response to such a threat is the fear it elicits, since fear both contributes to motivating protective responses, but can also lead to panic-driven behaviors. Furthermore, lockdown measures affect well-being, making it important to identify protective factors that help to maintain high perceived levels of health during restrictions.

Physics - Materials Science - 15.03.2021
How do good metals go bad?
How do good metals go bad?
New measurements have solved a mystery in solid state physics: How is it that certain metals do not seem to adhere to the valid rules? We all have a clear picture in mind when we think of metals: We think of solid, unbreakable objects that conduct electricity and exhibit a typical metallic sheen. The behaviour of classical metals, for example their electrical conductivity, can be explained with well-known, well-tested physical theories.

Environment - 11.03.2021
Fossilized feeding frenzy: 47 million year old fly found with a full belly
Fossilized feeding frenzy: 47 million year old fly found with a full belly
An international team of scientists with Fridgeir Grímsson from the University of Vienna has found a previously unknown fossil fly species in old lake sediments of the Messel Pit, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Germany. In the stomach of the fossil insect, pollen from various plants could be detected, which allows rare insights into the feeding behavior, the ecology and the role of the fly as a pollinator.

Computer Science - Physics - 11.03.2021
Robots learn faster with quantum technology
Robots learn faster with quantum technology
Artificial intelligence is part of our modern life by enabling machines to learn useful processes such as speech recognition and digital personal assistants. A crucial question for practical applications is how fast such intelligent machines can learn. An experiment at the University of Vienna has answered this question, showing that quantum technology enables a speed-up in the learning process.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 11.03.2021
New Approach Found for Energy-Efficient AI Applications
New Approach Found for Energy-Efficient AI Applications
Researchers at TU Graz demonstrate a new design method for particularly energy-saving artificial neural networks that get by with extremely few signals and - similar to Morse code - also assign meaning to the pauses between the signals. Most new achievements in artificial intelligence (AI) require very large neural networks.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.03.2021
How a ladybug warps space-time
How a ladybug warps space-time
Vienna quantum physicists measure the smallest gravitational force yet Researchers at the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences, led by Markus Aspelmeyer have succeeded in measuring the gravitational field of a gold sphere, just 2 mm in diameter, using a highly sensitive pendulum - and thus the smallest gravitational force.

Pharmacology - Health - 08.03.2021
Psoriasis: study lays foundation for new treatment strategy
The precise choice of treatment for breast cancer depends upon the status of the hormone receptors (for oestrogen and progesterone). Their conventional determination by means of immunohistochemistry (IHC) is associated with a certain error rate, which can be reduced by adding genomic data. Even conventional statistics can bring about a notable improvement but now it is possible to use decision theory to optimally combine diagnostic findings, particularly where they are contradictory.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.03.2021
Promising metallodrug candidate for tumour therapy
Promising metallodrug candidate for tumour therapy
BOLD-100/KP1339 is a ruthenium-based anticancer agent that has been decisively co-developed at the University of Vienna and which has shown promising results in clinical trials in cancer patients. However, the mode of action of this metal compound has not yet been fully elucidated. Researchers from the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna have now been able to demonstrate that BOLD-100 binds to ribosomal proteins in tumour cells.

Physics - Life Sciences - 04.03.2021
New EU project 'ONEM' develops a unique hybrid imaging technique
New EU project ’ONEM’ develops a unique hybrid imaging technique
The ONEM project will develop a new non-invasive microscopy technique for imaging dynamic processes at interfaces, called Optical Near-field Electron Microscopy. Led by physicist Thomas Juffmann from the University of Vienna, ONEM - which has a budget of 3,7 million Euro - is one of only two proposals that succeeded in the topic "Measuring the Unmeasurable" of the call from the European Innovation Council.

Environment - Social Sciences - 02.03.2021
Lack of diversity in science
Lack of diversity in science
Women and the Global South are strikingly underrepresented Most publications in leading scientific journals are by male authors from English-speaking countries. This changes only slowly, according to a recent study on diversity in top authorship, concludes Bea Maas from the University of Vienna. Her new study examines the (non-existent) diversity in top authorship in science.

Electroengineering - 02.03.2021
Microchips of the Future: Suitable Insulators are Still Missing
Microchips of the Future: Suitable Insulators are Still Missing
Until now, hexagonal boron nitride was considered the insulator of choice for miniaturised transistors. New investigations by TU Wien (Vienna) show: this may not be the way to go. For decades, there has been a trend in microelectronics towards ever smaller and more compact transistors. 2D materials such as graphene are seen as a beacon of hope here: they are the thinnest material layers that can possibly exist, consisting of only one or a few atomic layers.

Life Sciences - Physics - 26.02.2021
05.03.: Gastvortrag: Swarming Behaviour in Confinement - How curved surfaces influence pattern formation in biology
05.03.: Gastvortrag: Swarming Behaviour in Confinement - How curved surfaces influence pattern formation in biology
Am 05. März 2021 hält Univ. Prof. John W. C. Dunlop einen Vortrag zum Thema "Swarming Behaviour in Confinement - How curved surfaces influence pattern formation in biology." Der Vortrag findet um 14 Uhr online via Webex statt. Der Fachbereich Biowissenschaften lädt herzlich dazu ein! Univ.

Life Sciences - Environment - 23.02.2021
Mutable: Graz Researchers Decode Genome of Two Cichlid Species
Nature and man must constantly adapt to new living conditions. A research team from Graz has investigated how this is done and which genes play an important role in this process using the model system of the Great Lakes of East Africa. Global warming, environmental change, dried up food sources: nature and man must constantly adapt to new living conditions.

Physics - Chemistry - 23.02.2021
Twin atoms: A source for entangled particles
Twin atoms: A source for entangled particles
Quantum experiments that could previously only be performed with photons are now also possible with atoms: Beams of entangled atoms have been produced at TU Wien (Vienna). Heads or tails? If we toss two coins into the air, the result of one coin toss has nothing to do with the result of the other. Coins are independent objects.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 22.02.2021
Brenner Base Tunnel as a Lighthouse Project: Tunnels to become CO2-neutral energy suppliers
Brenner Base Tunnel as a Lighthouse Project: Tunnels to become CO2-neutral energy suppliers
Research association led by TU Graz wants to use the heat contained in the discharged tunnel water to supply energy to entire city districts. As part of the FFG programme "City of the Future", a sustainable concept for the city of Innsbruck is being developed. Additional Images for download at the end of the text After completion in about ten years, the Brenner base tunnel is expected to provide relief for transit traffic between Italy and Austria.

Physics - Materials Science - 22.02.2021
Magnetic effect without a magnet
Magnetic effect without a magnet
Surprise in solid-state physics: The Hall effect, which normally requires magnetic fields, can also be generated in a completely different way - with extreme strength. Electric current is deflected by a magnetic field - in conducting materials this leads to the so-called Hall effect. This effect is often used to measure magnetic fields.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 19.02.2021
Life of a pure Martian design
Life of a pure Martian design
Experimental microbially assisted chemolithotrophy provides an opportunity to trace the putative bioalteration processes of the Martian crust. A study on the Noachian Martian breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 composed of ancient (ca. Gyr old) crustal materials from Mars, led by ERC grantee Tetyana Milojevic from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna, now delivered a unique prototype of microbial life experimentally designed on a real Martian material.

Physics - Computer Science - 17.02.2021
Quantum computing: when ignorance is wanted
Quantum computing: when ignorance is wanted
Quantum technologies for computers open up new concepts of preserving the privacy of input and output data of a computation. Scientists from the University of Vienna, the Singapore University of Technology and Design and the Polytechnic University of Milan have shown that optical quantum systems are not only particularly suitable for some quantum computations, but can also effectively encrypt the associated input and output data.

Physics - 10.02.2021
Quantum effects help minimise communication flaws
Quantum effects help minimise communication flaws
Noise limits the performance of modern quantum technologies. However, particles traveling in a superposition of paths can bypass noise in communication. A collaboration between the Universities of Hong-Kong, Grenoble and Vienna, as well as the Austrian Academy of Sciences, under the lead of Philip Walther, reveals novel techniques to reduce noise in quantum communication.